• joel martin
Provost and Dean of the Faculty
Office of the Provost

Biography 

 Joel Martin joined Franklin & Marshall in July 2014, arriving from the University of Massachusetts where he held faculty and administrative appointments since 2006, and where he served as Vice Provost for Academic Personnel and Dean of the Faculty since 2010. Prior to his appointments at UMass, Joel was Costo Endowed Chairholder in American Indian Affairs and Professor of History and Religious Studies at the University of California-Riverside. In the last two years of his tenure at Riverside, he served as Interim Dean in the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.  This is a homecoming of sorts for Joel, as he began his academic career here at F&M in the Religious Studies department in 1998, and chaired the department in 1996-2000.

Education 

Ph.D. in the History of Religions, with Honors, Duke University, 1988

Masters of Theological Studies, Harvard University, 1982

Essens Universität, Germany, 1980

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College, summa cum laude​, 1979


Publications 

Books

Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape, eds. Joel W. Martin and Mark Nicholas (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010).

Native American Religion, New York: Oxford University Press, 1999, 157 pp.  Reissued in paperback under new title and with new preface.  The Land Looks After Us: A History of Native American Religion. Religion in American Life Series.  New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2001, xiv, 156 pp.

Screening the Sacred: Religion, Mythology and Ideology in Popular American Film, eds. Joel W. Martin and Conrad Ostwalt, Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1995, 193 pp.

Sacred Revolt: The Muskogees' Struggle for a New World, Boston: Beacon Press, 1991, 233 pp.


Book Chapters

“Introduction,” in Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape, (Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 2010), pp. 1-20.

“Crisscrossing Projects of Sovereignty and Conversion: Cherokee Christians and New England Missionaries during the 1820s,” in Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape, (Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 2010), pp. 67-89.

“Visions of Revitalization in the Eastern Woodlands: Can a Middle-Aged Theory Stretch to Embrace the First Cherokee Converts?,” in Reassessing Revitalization Movements: Perspectives from North America and the Pacific Islands, ed. Michael E. Harkin, (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004), pp. 61-87.

“Almost White: The Ambivalent Promise of Christian Missions among the Cherokees,” in Craig Prentiss, ed., Religion, Myth, and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity, (NYU Press, 2003), pp. 43-60.

“The Green Corn Ceremony of the Muskogee,” in Religions of the United States in Practice, ed. Colleen McDannell (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001), pp. 48-66. [Refereed]

“The Visions of Plenty-coups,” in Religions of the United States in Practice, ed.Colleen McDannell (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001), pp. 181-196.  [Refereed]

“Creek (Muskogee),” in Lawrence E. Sullivan, ed., Native Religions and Cultures of North America, (New York: Continuum, 2000), pp. 55-73.  Reprinted and translated as "Creek (Muskogee) Religion," in Lawrence E. Sullivan, ed., Religioni indigene dell'America (Milan, Italy: Jaca Book, November, 2000).

"My Grandmother was a Cherokee Princess: Representations of Indians in Southern History," in Dressing in Feathers: The Construction of the Indian in American Popular Culture, ed. by S. Elizabeth Bird, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1996, pp. 129-47.

"Redeeming America: Rocky as Ritual Racial Drama" in Screening the Sacred: Myth, Ritual, & Religion in Popular American Film, eds. Joel W. Martin and Conrad E. Ostwalt, Jr., Boulder, CO: Westview, 1995, pp.125-133.

"Indians, Contact and Colonialism in the Deep South," in Narrating American Religious History, ed. Thomas Tweed, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995, pp. 149-180.

"From 'Middle Ground' to 'Underground': Southeastern Indians and the Early Republic," in American Religion: A Reader, ed. David Hackett, New York: Routledge Press, 1995, pp. 127-145.  Revised and reprinted as “Cultural Contact and Crises in the Early Republic: Native American Religious Renewal, Resistance, and Accommodation,” in Frederick E. Hoxie, Ronald Hoffman, and Peter J. Albert, eds., Native Americans and the Early Republic, (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1999), pp. 226-258.

"Introduction:  Seeing the Sacred on the Screen," in Screening the Sacred: Myth, Ritual, & Religion in Popular American Film, eds. Joel W. Martin and Conrad E. Ostwalt, Jr., Boulder, CO: Westview, 1995, pp. 1-12.

"Southeastern Indians and the English Trade in Skins and Slaves," in The Forgotten Centuries: Indians and Europeans in the American South, 1521-1704, eds. Charles Hudson and Carmen Chavez McClendon, Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994, pp. 304-324.


Articles

“Anti-Feminism in Recent Apocalyptic Film,” in Journal of Religion and Film, Vol. 4, No. 1 (April 2000), 19pp.  (A fully peer reviewed electronic journal accredited by The Association of Peer-Reviewed Electronic Journals in Religion).

"Foreward,” in Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 21, No. 2 (Spring, 1995), pp. 207-215.  Special Issue on “The Scholarship of Cultural Contact: Decolonizing Native American History" by guest eds. Joel W. Martin and M. Annette Jaimes Guerrero.

"The Creek Prophetic Movement," Alabama Heritage, Winter 1992, No. 23, pp. 4-13.

"Before and Beyond the Sioux Ghost Dance: Native American Prophetic Movements and the Discourse of the Study of Religion,"  Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 59, No. 4, 1991, pp. 677-701.

Reprinted in War in Heaven / Heaven on Earth: Theories of the Apocalyptic, Volume 2 in the Millennium and Society Series (London, UK: Equinox Publishing Ltd., 2005), ed. Stephen O'Leary and Glen McGhee, 95-118.


Essays

"All That is Solid (and Southern) Melts into Air: A Response to Sam Hill's Fundamental Argument Concerning Fundamentalism," in the Journal of Southern Religion (a fully peer reviewed electronic journal accredited by The Association of Peer-Reviewed Electronic Journals in Religion), Vol. 1, No. 1, 1998, 3 pp.  [Invited]

"'Cults' Killed" (invited contribution to a special Forum, "Interpreting Waco"), in Religion and American Culture Vol. 8, No. 1, 1998, pp. 8-17.

"Indian Sightings in Lancaster County: The Mythic, Religious Significance of 'Indians' for Non-Indians," American Indian Religions: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Vol. 2, 1994, pp. 151-172.

“Teaching Religion in America," Course Outlines: Young Scholars in American Religion, Indianapolis, Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, 1993, pp. 1-8. [Invited]

"New Perspectives on Native Americans,"  "Opinion Piece" the Chronicle of Higher Education, 1991, Vol. 38, No. 9, pp. B1-2. [Invited]