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The Articulation Problem

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In a recent presentation to Franklin & Marshall students, faculty, and professional staff, Phil Gardner, Ph.D., director of the Collegiate Employment Research Institute at Michigan State University, showed the audience a hierarchy of the experiences that employers value and want young job applicants to have...


Law School: Best of Times or Worst of Times?

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“Is this a good time to go to law school?”  This is the question I posed to Prof. Ben Barros, a professor at Widener Law School, when he was at F&M on Tuesday to teach his first day of property law – often the very first day of class for first-year law students.  His answer:  “This is the BEST time to go to law school – for someone who really wants to be a lawyer - in 30 years.  Applications are down nationwide, and it’s likely that in three years, the economy will be stronger.”


Dear Admissions Committee

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As encouragement to all, I have two main things to say:  Yes, there are people out there who read these letters of recommendation (in fact, it's part of their job).  Thus, your work is significant and worthwhile.  And remember, an individual letter writer is but one voice among several singing in support of an applicant.  Therefore, each letter need not describe its subject completely; rather, it need only give an informed perspective from within the context that the author and applicant know each other.


What Employers Are Saying

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This past week I had the opportunity to travel to New York City and meet with alumni and employers to develop partnerships beneficial to our students. Great information, suggestions and observations came out of my four days of meetings. This is what the employers are saying...


Maturity

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Last Friday, I attended a one-day conference hosted by Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, the new allopathic medical school in Camden.  We Philly-area pre-health advisers like to get together every January at a different health professional school, engaging in dialogue about timely professional topics, hearing updates from Admissions deans, and generally comparing notes . . .  


Both Critics and Advocates Offer Incomplete Perspective in Law School Debate

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As with battle over the value of higher education that I discussed in my previous blog post (and which resurfaced this weekend in the New York Times in an article misleading and worthy of critique in its own right), critics and advocates alike have taken to the newspapers and blogosphere to make their case regarding the value (economic or otherwise) of law school and a legal education.


Speed-Dating Your Way into Health Professional School

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I can’t say I’ve ever participated in a “speed dating” exercise.  I intentionally call it an “exercise” instead of a “game,” since to me it sounds painful, an activity akin to Karaoke Night or watching reality TV.  The idea of people lining up in a gym to present themselves to strangers in five-minute sound bites seems a little forced, even superficial...


Awaken Your Inner Motivational Speaker

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Standing at the front of an audience-filled room with two minutes until I present the findings of my most recent research on how women leaders in higher education construct an active voice and lead for change, I am mildly nervous.  I am nervous because I hope to captivate and excite the audience and, following lunch with a keynote address can make that …even more of a challenge.  


In Defense of Higher Education

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“The American public and senior administrators at U.S. colleges and universities overwhelmingly agree that higher education is in crisis, according to a new poll, but they fundamentally disagree over how to fix it and even what the main purpose of higher education is.” So begins a recent article in Time’s aptly named series “Reinventing Higher Education” – a collection of pieces that encapsulates a recent consensus of the mainstream press and American public...


What You Did Last Summer

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Whether or not to take a class next summer is a common question among pre-health students this time of year.  You're looking at your current workload as well as the demands of next year, including requirements for your major (and maybe minor).  You're also looking at, perhaps fixedly, your grades in the pre-health curriculum thus far . . .  Is doing one of the required courses for health professional school over the summer a "Way Out"?  Is it advisable?