Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College

Stanley A. Mertzman

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Looking from Doaks Mountain, which is east of Mountain Lakes. Highest point is Aspen Butte, whose summit is 820 feet high with Little Aspen Butte being the second dominant structure, located on the south facing slope.

Little Aspen Butte at higher elevation with Clover Butte visible at lower elevation.

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Close up of the glacial carved out summit region of Aspen Butte with the arrow focused on the exposed conduit of the 470,000 year old composite volcano. Glacial erosion, primarily head-ward erosion of an alpine glacier producing a cirque basin, has etched out the vertically oriented volcanic conduit.

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Well-developed, platy jointing in Aspen butte lava flow, produces a shale-like bedding fissility of clastic sedimentary rocks.