Curriculum Overview

 

Africana Studies is an interdisciplinary program combining the study of Africa and the African Diaspora, including the African American experience. Several disciplines contribute to Africana Studies at Franklin & Marshall, among them American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, English, Government, History, Music, Religious Studies and Sociology.

A major in Africana Studies consists of nine courses: AFS/AMS 150 or AFS/HIS 249 or AFS/HIS241 or 242; AFS/HIS 333 or AFS/HIS 331 or 332; AFS 490; and five electives, at least one of which must be numbered 300 or higher. At least one elective must come from American Studies, Art, English, French, Music or Religious Studies; at least one elective must come from Anthropology, Economics, Government or Sociology. Prospective majors should take note that some of the electives may have prerequisites (e.g., introductory level courses in anthropology, economics or sociology), such that the number of courses necessary to complete the AFS major may exceed nine.

A minor in Africana Studies consists of six of the following courses: AFS/AMS 150 or AFS/HIS 249; AFS/HIS 241 or 242, AFS/HIS 333 or 331 or 332, and three electives, one of which must be numbered 300 or higher.

For further information, students should consult the Africana Studies Program Chair.

Recent Africana Studies Program students have studied abroad in the following programs in recent years: Ghana, Kenya, South Africa and Guyana. See the International Programs section of the Catalog for further information.

Core Courses

A list of regularly offered courses follows. Please note the key for the following abbreviations: (A) Arts; (H) Humanities; (S) Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP) Natural Science in Perspective; (NW) Non-Western Cultures requirement. 

 

Elective Courses 

Interdisciplinary Topics Courses (Also Electives)

Students may also select electives for the AFS major and minor from topics courses offered by the following departments: American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, English, Government, History, Judaic Studies, Music, Psychology, Religious Studies and Sociology. Topics courses taken in these departments will count toward the AFS major only if they primarily address issues surrounding Africa and the African Diaspora and are alternatively designated “AFS.”