Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College

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Courses Offered
Classics

A list of regularly offered courses follows. Please note the key for the following abbreviations: (A) Arts; (H) Humanities; (S) Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP) Natural Science in Perspective; (NW) Non-Western Cultures requirement.

COURSES IN ENGLISH

Designated as “Classics,” the following courses require no knowledge of Greek or Latin, unless otherwise indicated.

113. The History of Ancient Greece. (S) 

Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great in the Mediterranean and Near Eastern context. Students are also introduced to the problems and methods of historical inquiry. Same as HIS 113. Castor

114. The History of Ancient Rome. (S) 

The transformation from Republic to Principate and the collapse of the empire are explored. Students are also introduced to the problems and methods of historical inquiry. Same as HIS 114. Castor

115. Greek Art and Archaeology. (A)

This course provides an overview of the archaeological monuments of ancient Greece. Coursework will focus on methodological approaches to analyzing building techniques, trends, styles and the social, political and religious functions of art and monumental architecture in ancient Greek society. Topics covered in lecture and classroom discussion will include archaeological and art historical interpretations of sacred and public architecture, urbanism, three-dimensional sculpture, relief sculpture, painting and decorative arts. There is a required field trip. Same as ART 115. Steiner

117. Roman Art and Archaeology. (A)

This course provides an overview of the archaeological monuments of ancient Rome. Coursework will focus on methodological approaches to analyzing building techniques, trends, styles and the social, political and religious functions of art and monumental architecture in ancient Roman society. Topics covered in lecture and classroom discussion will include archaeological and art historical interpretations of sacred and public architecture, urbanism, three-dimensional sculpture, relief sculpture, painting and decorative arts. There is a required field trip. Same as ART 117. Surtees

210. History of Ancient Philosophy. (H)

The origin and development of the major themes of Greek philosophy from the Milesians through Aristotle. Same as PHI 210. Franklin

230. Classical Myth. (H)

Introduction to the myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their relationship to the art, history, philosophy and religions of their respective cultures. Students will explore the Classical conception of the interactions between mortals, heroes and divinities through a wide range of media and textual genres. Connections between Greek and Roman myths as well as the adaptation of mythical traditions from Near East cultures will be discussed.

242. Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity. (H)

The aim of this course is to explore the cultural constructions of gender and sexuality in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome. We will approach questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire and the body. We will examine archaeological, visual and literary evidence through assigned reading and class discussion. This interdisciplinary approach will allow us to gain an understanding of gender and sexuality in antiquity and will offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes. Same as WGS 242. Meyers 

321. Selected Studies in Greek History. (S)

A close examination of a particular period, place or individual in ancient Greek history. Seminar topics include “Alexander the Great” and “5th-century Athens.” Prerequisite: CLS/HIS 113. Same as HIS 321. Castor

322. Selected Studies in Roman History. (S)

A close examination of a particular period, place or individual in ancient Roman history. Seminar topics include “Imperial Women: Power Behind the Throne.” Prerequisite: CLS/HIS 114. Same as HIS 322. Castor

353. Summer Fieldwork in Classical Archaeology. (H) 1.5 credits

Hands-on training in archaeological field methods, including excavation technique and preparation of a field notebook. Students work for six weeks at the Etruscan site of Poggio Colla, part of the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project, co-sponsored by Franklin & Marshall, Southern Methodist University and the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania. Prerequisites: CLS 114 or 115 or 117 or ANT 102 and permission of the instructor. Offered only in the Summer. Meyers, Steiner

37x. Topics in Greek Art and Archaeology. (A)

A close examination of a particular aspect of ancient Greek sculpture, architecture, or vase painting, or a close study of the archaeological remains from a particular chronological period of ancient Greece. Seminar topics include “Greeks in South Italy.” Prerequisite: ART/CLS 115 or permission. Same as ART 37x. Steiner

37x. Topics in Roman Art and Archaeology. (A)

A close examination of a particular aspect of ancient Roman sculpture, architecture or painting, or a close study of the archaeological remains from a particular chronological period of ancient Rome. Seminar topics include “Art of the Augustan Age.” Prerequisite: ART/CLS 117 or permission. Same as ART 37x. Meyers

381. Plato. (H)

An intensive treatment of some of the major philosophical themes in selected dialogues of Plato. Prerequisite: CLS/PHI 210. Same as PHI 381.

421. Alexander the Great. (H)

At age 20, a young prince inherited the rich and powerful kingdom of Macedon upon the assassination of his father. Thirteen years later, he had conquered territory from Greece to India and was worshipped as a god. Such unimaginable accomplishments can be matched only by Alexander’s own extreme personality. What qualities or talents did Alexander have that allowed him to achieve such success? This question has intrigued historians, philosophers, and biographers since his own time. We will consult a variety of ancient sources—texts, images, archaeological remains—in order to study the historical and cultural circumstances of the era, the personality of the man, and the history of his legend. Prerequisite: CLS113 and permission of the instructor. Castor

 

GREEK

101. Elementary Ancient Greek I.

Introduction to the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Offered every Fall. Biles

102. Elementary Ancient Greek II.

Continues the study of the basic grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Prerequisite: GRK 101 or placement. Offered Every Spring. Biles

201. Introduction to Greek Prose. (LS)

Review of principles of grammar and syntax through composition exercises and introductory readings of authentic Greek prose. Prerequisite: GRK 102 or placement. Offered every Fall. Castor

202. Introduction to Greek Poetry. (H)

Introduction to Greek poetry with emphasis on diction, meter and literary interpretation. Prerequisite: GRK 201 or permission of the instructor. Offered every Spring. Biles, O’Bryhim

311. Greek Historians.* (H)

An examination of the historical writings of Herodotus and Thucydides with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Castor, Biles

312. Greek Oratory.* (H)

An examination of the Athenian orators Lysias and Demosthenes with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

314. Greek Lyric Poetry.* (H)

An examination of selected Archaic lyric poets (e.g. Archilochus, Sappho, Alcaeus, Alcman), with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

315. Greek Comedy.* (H)

An examination of a comedy of Aristophanes with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Biles, O’Bryhim

316. Greek Tragedy.* (H)

An examination of a tragedy with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Biles

320. Greek Philosophy.* (H)

An examination of a Platonic dialogue with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

321. Greek Epic.* (H)

An examination of Homer’s Iliad with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Biles

*Repeatable by permission of department.

 

LATIN

101. Elementary Latin I.

Introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of Classical Latin. Normally open only to students who have had no prior experience in the formal study of Latin. Offered every Fall. Biles, O’Bryhim

102. Elementary Latin II. 

Continues and completes the study of the basic grammar and syntax of Classical Latin. Prerequisite: LAT 101 or placement. Offered every Spring. O’Bryhim, Fowler

103. Accelerated Latin.

Intensive study of Latin grammar. This course compresses the material from LAT 101 and 102 into one semester, thus enabling the student to enter LAT 201 after one semester of instruction. Intended for motivated students and for those who have placed into this course after taking Latin in high school. Staff

201. Introduction to Latin Prose. (LS)

Introduction to Latin prose incorporating a review of forms and structures. Successful completion of the course signifies that the student has mastered the elements of Latin and is prepared to begin the study of Roman texts. Prerequisite: LAT 102 or placement. Offered every Fall. O’Bryhim

202. Introduction to Latin Poetry. (H)

Introduction to Latin poetry with the goal of developing speed and facility in meter and interpretation. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or placement. Offered every Spring. O’Bryhim

311. Latin Historians.* (H)

An examination of the histories of Tacitus with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. O’Bryhim

312. Latin Oratory.* (H)

An examination of the speeches of Cicero with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

313. Latin Epic.* (H)

An examination of selected Latin epics with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Biles

315. Latin Comedy.* (H)

An examination of the comedies of Plautus with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

316. Latin Tragedy.* (H)

An examination of the tragedies of Seneca with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

318. Latin Satire.* (H)

An examination of the satires of Horace, Persius and Juvenal with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Biles

319. Latin Letters.* (H)

An examination of the letters of Cicero, Pliny and Fronto with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

320. Latin Philosophy.* (H)

An examination of the philosophical works of Cicero with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research. Staff

*Repeatable by permission of department.

 

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2014 – 2015

Roman Novel: Petronious.

Greek Tragedy.