Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College

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  • David M. Brennan

    Associate Professor of Economics, Chair of Economics
    717-291-3936
    Office: STA330

    Professional Biography

    TEACHING EXPERIENCE

    Associate Professor, Department of Economics
    Franklin & Marshall College (7/07-present)
    Develop and teach courses in political economy, financial crisis, statistics, and cross-disciplinary views of work.

    Assistant Professor, Department of Economics
    Franklin & Marshall College (7/01-6/07)
    Developed and taught courses in political economy, financial crisis, statistics, culture of work, and microeconomics.

    Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Economics
    Franklin & Marshall College (5/00-6/01)
    Developed and taught courses in political economy, microeconomics, and critical thinking.

    Visiting Instructor
    , Department of Economics
    Franklin & Marshall College (7/98-5/00)
    Developed and taught courses in microeconomics and political economy.

    Graduate Fellow, College of Arts and Letters
    University of Notre Dame (8/94 - 5/95)
    Developed and lectured course entitled “Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking.”

    Teaching Assistant, Department of Economics
    University of Notre Dame (8/92 - 5/94)
    Team-taught introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics courses in both the Business School and the College of Arts and Letters.

    Education

    University of Notre Dame, 2000 - Ph.D. Economics

    Comprehensive Examination Areas: Political Economy, Econometrics
    Dissertation: Social Structure of Investment: Three Essays on the New Finance Literature.
    Dissertation Committee: David Ruccio, Teresa Ghilarducci, Martin Wolfson, and Stephen Cullenberg.

    University of Notre Dame, 1997 - M.A. Economics

    University of Miami, 1990 - B.B.A. Economics

    Research Interests

    Research Areas:

    Political Economy, Financial Crisis and Policy, Corporate Governance, Pensions, History of Economic Thought, Feminist Economics

    Research in Progress:

    “A Kaleckian Investigation of U.S. Profitability” 

     
    Handbook of Marxian Economics
     

    Grants & Awards

    Undergraduate and Graduate Awards and Distinctions

    Graduate Fellow, College of Arts and Letters, University of Notre Dame.
    Vadikin Memorial Scholarship, Dept. of Economics, University of Miami.
    Best and Brightest Award, School of Business Admin., University of Miami.
    Bowman Ashe Scholarship, School of Business Admin., University of Miami

    Publications

    Handbook of Marxian Economics ed. D. Brennan, D. Kristjanson-Gural, C. Mulder, and E. Olsen, London: Routledge. (under contract)
     
    2013. “Too Bright for Comfort: A Kaleckian View of Profit Realization in the U.S. from 1964 to 2009.” Cambridge Journal of Economics, 38, 239-255.
     
    2013. “If Class Transformation Can Happen There, It Can Happen….” Symposium on Unions and Class Transformation: The Case of the Broadway Musicians.  Rethinking Marxism: A Journal of Economics, Culture & Society, 25 no. 1: 109-113.

    2010. “Retirement’s Past, Present, and Possibilities.” Review Essay/Note Critique. Labour/Le Travail, 65. 161-173.

    2010. “The Bull-of-Last-Resort: How the U.S. Economy Capitalizes on Nationalism.” Rethinking Marxism: A Journal of Economics, Culture and Society,  22, no. 195-202.

    2010. “A Tale of Two Thailands: A Minskyan Analysis of Growth in Different Regimes.” Review of Radical Political Economics, 40, no. 1: 66-80.

    2008. “Stakeholders.” For the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences 2nd. Edition, General Editor, William Darity, Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Reference USA.

    2008. “Co-Opting the Shareholder Value Movement: A Class Analytic Model of Share Repurchases.” Review of Radical Political Economics, 40, no. 1: 89-106.

    2006. “Defending the Indefensible? Culture’s role in the productive/unproductive dichotomy.” Feminist Economics, 12, no. 3: 403-425.
    (Voted “Best New Journal” by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals, 1997) 

    2005. “‘Fiduciary Capitalism,’ the ‘Political Model of Corporate Governance,’ and the Prospect of Stakeholder Capitalism in the U.S.” Review of Radical Political Economics, 37, no. 1: 39-62.

    2003. “Enron and Failed Futures: A critical appraisal of policy and corporate governance in the wake of Enron’s collapse.” Social Text, 21, no. 4: 35-50.

    2003. “Enron: Understanding Deregulated Markets, Accounting Scandals, and Lost Savings.” Rethinking Marxism, 15, no. 4: 554-564.

    2003. “Hawley, James and Williams, Andrew The Rise of Fiduciary Capitalism: How Institutional Investors Can Make Corporate America More Democratic.” Review of Radical Political Economics, 34, no. 1: 80-84. (Book review).

    Presentations

    INVITED PRESENTATIONS

    “The Role of Class and Corporate Governance” presented for Capital Matters III: Managing Labor’s Capital, April 2005. The Labor & Worklife Program at Harvard Law School sponsored this conference.

    “‘Fiduciary Capitalism,’ the ‘Political Model of Corporate Governance,’ and the Prospect of Stake-Holder Capitalism in the U.S.” presented for Pension Fund Capitalism and the Crisis of Old-Age Security in the United States, September 2004. The Center for Economic Policy Analysis at The New School for Social Research sponsored this conference.

    CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

    “Navigating Contested Terrain.” for Rethinking Marxism’s 8th International Gala Conference, September 2013.

    “The Bull-of-Last-Resort: How the U.S. Economy Capitalizes on Nationalism.” Rethinking Marxism’s 7th International Gala Conference, November 2009.

    “Talk is Cheap for Some and Expensive for Others: Corporate Responses to Shareholder Activism and its Implications for Labor.” for the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, March 2007.

    “A model of CEO and Shareholder Power.” for Rethinking Marxism’s 6th International Gala Conference, October 2006.

    “How Powerful are Institutional Investors?” for Left Forum 2006, March 2006.

    “‘Fiduciary Capitalism,’ the ‘Political Model of Corporate Governance,’ and the Prospect of Stake-Holder Capitalism in the U.S.” for the Allied Social Science Association, January 2005.

    “Deconstructing Full Employment” for the 2004 Conference on Feminist Economics, August 2004.

    “Minsky and the Asymmetric Information Explanation of Financial Crisis” with Gillian Hewitson, for the Eastern Economic Association, February 2004.

    “Equity Market Activity Through a Marxian Lens” for Rethinking Marxism’s 5th International Gala Conference, November. 2003.

    “Understanding the M&A wave of the 1980s” for the Socialist Scholars Conference, March 2003.

    “Using Enron to Power Significant Class Changes” for the Socialist Scholars Conference, April 2002.

    “Progressive Pension Fund Management” for the Socialist Scholars Conference, April 2001.

    “Class Components and Possibilities of Pensions” for Rethinking Marxism’s 4th International Gala Conference, September 2000.

    “Expenditures, Power and Surplus Value: A Class-Based Critique of the Radical-Post-Keynesian Approach” for the Allied Social Science Association, January 1997.

    “Profits, Exploitation, and Investment: A Class-Based Critique of the Radical-Post-Keynesian Approach” for Rethinking Marxism’s 3rd International Gala Conference, December 1996.

    “Class and Post-Keynesianism” for the URPE Summer Conference, July 1994.

    “Subsumed Class Aspects of Financial Crisis” for Rethinking Marxism’s 2nd International Gala Conference, November 1992.

    “Comparing a Traditional Econometric Simultaneous Model with an
    Unstructured Neural Network Simultaneous Output Model” with Lawrence Marsh, for the Eastern Economic Association Meetings, March 1992.

    “Historical Overview of Neural Network Research” Theory and Method Workshop, Notre Dame, November 1991.

    Course Information

    ECO 103: Economic Perspectives
    ECO 105: Introduction to Microeconomics
    ECO 210: Economic Statistics
    ECO 370: Financial Crisis
    CCS 128: Cultivating Critique
    CCS163/FND 151: What is Work?