Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College

  • People
  • Michael R. Koss

    Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy
    Office:
    Office Hours: Tuesdays 10:30 am - 12:30 pm, Wednesdays 12:00 - 2:00 pm, and by appointment
    Summary: Logic, Philosophy of Mathematics

    Professional Biography

    Michael Koss received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from Indiana University. His research focuses on the foundations of logic and mathematics, with special focus on constructive mathematical theories and intuitionistic logic. He is currently engaged in projects concerning applications of constructive mathematics in the natural sciences, disputes about fundamental logical principles, and the work of the mathematician L.E.J. Brouwer.

    Education

    Ph.D. in Philosophy, Indiana University, 2013

    B.A. in Philosophy and Mathematics, University of Michigan, 2006

    Grants & Awards

    • Louise B. McNutt Graduate School Dissertation Fellowship, Graduate School of Arts and 
      Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Academic Year 2011-2012.
    • Graduate Academic Excellence Award, Department of Philosophy, Indiana University, 2008
    • Outstanding Associate Instructor, Department of Philosophy, Indiana University, 2007.
    • Dean’s Merit Scholarship, University of Michigan College of Literature, Sciences, and the 
      Arts, 2002-2006.

    Presentations

    Refereed Conference Presentations:
     
    1. “On Deviance and Mutilation”, 5th Midwest Conference on Philosophy of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN, March 15th, 2013.
    2. “The Coherence of Classical Mathematics from the Constructive Point of View”, 2nd Midwest Conference on Philosophy of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN, Nov. 11th, 2011.
    3. “Wittgenstein on Meaning and Dummett’s Antirealism”, Midsouth Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, March 5th, 2011.
    4. “Reexamining Brouwer’s Earliest Challenge to Classical Logic”, Indiana Philosophical Association Fall Meeting 2009, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, Dec. 12th, 2009.
     
    Invited Conference Presentations, Commentaries, and Colloquium Presentations:
     
    1. Commentary on Louis Gularte’s “On the (Im)possibility of Being a Monkey’s Uncle”, Indiana Philosophical Association Fall Meeting 2012, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, Nov. 17th, 2012.ichael R. Koss, CV: Page 2 of 4
    2. “Some Obstacles Facing a Semantic Foundation for Intuitionistic Logic,” University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Feb. 7th, 2012.
    3. “Some Obstacles Facing a Semantic Foundation for Intuitionistic Logic,” California State University San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, Feb. 3rd, 2012.
    4. Commentary on Marc Zelcer’s “Five Arguments Against Mathematical Explanation in Mathematics”, 2nd Midwest Conference on Philosophy of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN, Nov. 11th, 2011.
    5. Commentary on Eric Snyder’s “Type Pluralism and the Semantics of Measurement”, Indiana Philosophical Association Fall Meeting 2011, Hanover College, Hanover, IN, Oct. 22nd, 2011.
    6. “Wittgenstein on Meaning and Dummett’s Antirealism”, Indiana Philosophical Association Spring Meeting 2011, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, Apr. 29th, 2011.
    7. Commentary on Joshua Skorburg’s “The Ethical Dimension of Plato’s Theaetetus: Flying Philosopher and Scampering Sophist”, Indiana Philosophical Association Spring Meeting 2011, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, Apr. 29th, 2011.
    8. Commentary on Brianna Tool’s “Fictional Entities: A Case for Neo-Meinongism”, Indiana Philosophical Association Spring Meeting 2011, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, Apr. 29th, 2011.
    9. Commentary on David Beisecker’s “Incompatibility and the Logic of Proscribed Contents”, Midsouth Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, March 4th, 2011.
    10. “A Comparison of 13th Century Theories of Supposition”, The 12th Annual E.A. Moody Workshop in Medieval Philosophy: The Logic of Peter of Spain, University of Calfornia Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, March 7th, 2009.

    Course Information

    PHI100: Introduction to Philosophy. This course will introduce students to philosophy via ex- aminations of a variety of philosophical questions and texts. Topics will include accounts of moral standards, God and religious belief, the ground of political obligation, the possibility of artificial intelligence, the status of scientific knowledge, and the value of philosophy. As many of the readings as possible will be drawn from seminal writings by philosophers of historical and contemporary significance. The course will also be devoted to cultivating students’ writing and writing skills, and special attention will be paid to these throughut the term.

    PHI210: History of Ancient Philosophy. This course will introduce students to the central problems and themes discussed by ancient Greek philosophers from Thales to Aristotle (spanning roughly 550-322 BCE). The topics we will cover include the number and kinds of things that exist, the nature of change, the possibility of knowledge about the natural world, the relationship between knowledge and moral virtue, the possibility of human excellence, and the task of the philosopher.