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Life's a Wave; How You Ride It is Quantum Physics

Can we find the love of our life based on whether their trough is as deep as our own? Whether their crest reaches ours? Can wavelength determine business success?

Franklin & Marshall College alumnus, author and physicist Kunal Das '95 believes we can answer all these questions, and more, with quantum physics. Das returns to F&M at 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 23, to explain his theory at a Joint Math Colloquium.  The series began 20 years ago and occurs weekly during the semester, with the host site alternating between F&M and Millersville University.

The lecture, coordinated by F&M's Mathematics and Computer Science Department and Millersville, will take place in the Bonchek Lecture Hall in the Ann & Richard Barshinger Life Sciences & Philosophy Building. It is free and open to the public.

  • Kunal Das Math Colloquium
  • Franklin & Marshall College alumnus, author and physicist Kunal Das '95 believes questions from business success to success in relationships can be answered with quantum physics. Das returns to F&M at 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 23, to explain his theory at a Joint Math Colloquium. (Photo Courtesy of Kunal Das) 

Das, who graduated from F&M with a double major in math and physics, wants to make math and physics more accessible to the general public through his recently published book, "The Quantum Guide to Life: How the Laws of Physics Explains Our Lives from Laziness to Love."

"He's taking mathematical ideas and applying them to life," said Christina M. Weaver, assistant professor of mathematics, who is helping organize the event.

Now a Kutztown University professor and scholar at the Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Das promises an easy-to-understand and entertaining talk. He said he wanted to write a book "that everyone can relate to."

"There are a lot of great, popular physics books, but they're usually for people who are already interested in that science," Das said. "This is a very different kind of physics book, one that shows how the physical world works in relation to your own."

In the book's introduction, Das writes: "In quantum physics, we can find answers and justifications for almost every aspect of our lives, from the fundamentally profound -- such as why life is so full of compromises -- to the utterly mundane, such as why it always takes effort to keep things tidy."

Das said his book isn't intended to be a self-help guide, but if your life improves from reading it, he won't argue. His purpose is to give readers another view on life through the lens of quantum physics.

"What I'm doing is giving you a different perspective on your life," he said. "If some of that perspective helps you, that's great."