2/12/2009

Unmasking Caricature

  • http-blogs-fandm-edu-wp-content-blogs-dir-29-files-2012-04-rauser-jpg Amelia Rauser  

The Philadelphia Alumni Writers House welcomes Amelia Rauser at noon on Wednesday, Feb. 18, to discuss her new book Caricature Unmasked: Irony, Authenticity and Individualism in Eighteenth-Century English Prints.

Rauser, associate professor of art & art history, will discuss researching her book and the role caricature has played in political discourse since the 1780s. Her book examines the meaning encoded in the form of caricature.

“Caricature filled a need to understand politics not as the wrangling of interests, but rather as the actions of real individuals whose authenticity needed to be evaluated. Caricature unmasked the pretensions of individuals, attempting to reveal their authentic, interior selves,” Rauser said.

“First invented in the studios of artists in 17th-century Rome, caricature wasn’t used for published, political representation — the main way we experience it today — until around 1780, when it invaded the bustling print market of 18th-century London,” she said.

Lunch will be provided. Rauser’s talk is co-sponsored by the Department of Art & Art History.

The book is available in the campus bookstore.

Story 5/15/2015

Uncovering the Invisible Process of Creating

To many, the art of writing is a mystery, a process that is invisible to the unknowing. Recent...

Read More
Story 5/13/2015

Scouring Ancient Landscapes for Clues to Cleaner Water

Having made their mark on the natural landscape the last few hundred years, humans are now undoing...

Read More
Story 5/10/2015

Commencement 2015: Highlights Video

About 3,000 family and friends packed Franklin & Marshall College's Hartman Green May 9 to...

Read More