• Padmini Mongia
Professor of English
English

Biography

 
Professor of English, Franklin & Marshall College (2001-present)
Associate Professor of English, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (2008-2010)
Chair, Department of English, Franklin & Marshall College (1999-2002)
Associate Professor of English, Franklin & Marshall College (1994-2001)
Visiting Associate Professor, University of Rome, "La Sapienza" (spring 1996)
Assistant Professor of English, Franklin & Marshall College (1989-1994)
Assistant Professor of English, University of Richmond (1987-1989)

Education

1987 Ph. D. in English. The Pennsylvania State University "First-Person Narratives as Autobiography: The Case of Charlotte Brontë"


1981 M. A. in English. Miranda House College, University of Delhi


1979 B. A. Honors in English. Lady Shri Ram College, University of Delhi

Research

  • Contemporary Indian writing
  • Marketing of Indian literature
  • Children's literature
  • Indian Women's Writing
  • Gothic and Adventure Fiction

Grants & Awards

  • 2002-2003. NEH Fellowship to work on IndoChic: Marketing Indian Fiction
  • Summer 2001 NEH Summer Fellowship for College Teachers to do research for IndoChic
  • 1994 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, University of Pennsylvania.
  • 1991 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, University of Texas at Austin.
  • 1987 Sparks Fellowship Designate, The Pennsylvania State University
  • 1986 Graduate School Fellowship, The Pennsylvania State University
  • 1985-86 American Association of University Women Dissertation Fellowship
  • 1983-84 Sparks Fellowship, The Pennsylvania State University
  • 1983 Folger Institute Fellowship to attend the seminar "English Poetic Forms"

Publications

 Selected Publications: 


  • “The Making and Marketing of Arundhati Roy.”  In Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things.  Ed.  Alex Tickell.  Routledge 2007.  103-109. 
  • “Between Men: Conrad in the Fiction of Two Contemporary Indian Writers.”  in Conrad in the 21st Century.  Eds.  Peter Mallios, Andrea White, and Carola Kaplan.  Routledge, 2005.  85-100.           
  • “Medieval Travel in Postcolonial Times: Amitav Ghosh's In an Antique Land." in Perspectives on Travel Writing: Borders and Crossings.  Eds.  Glenn Hooper and Tim Youngs.  London: Ashgate Publishing, 2005.  153-166. 
  • "Why I Teach Conrad and Achebe." in Teaching Approaches to Conrad's Heart of Darkness. Eds. Hunt Hawkins and Brian Schaeffer.  New York: MLA, 2002.   104-110. 
  • "The Rescue: Conrad, Achebe, and the Critics.”  Conradiana 33.2 (Summer 2001): 153-163.
  • "Confession and Self-making in the Fiction of Contemporary Indian Women Writers." In 
  • Telling Stories: Postcolonial Short Fiction in English.  Ed. Jacqueline Bardolph.  Amsterdam: Rodopi. 2001.  293-301. 
  • "Contemporary Indian Women Writing in English and the Exclusions of the Postcolonial Canon."  Translating Cultures.  Eds.  Isabel Carrera Suárez, Aurora García Fernández, and M. S. Suárez Lafuente.  Oviedo/Hebden Bridge: KRK Dangaroo Press, 1999.  87-92. 
  • "New Writing by Indian Women." Women: A Cultural Review 8.3 (December 1997): 339-345. 
  • Contemporary Postcolonial Theory: A Reader.  (compiled and edited with an introduction.)  New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1997.
  • Contemporary Postcolonial Theory: A Reader.  London: Arnold, 1996. (compiled and edited with an introduction.) 
  • "'Ghosts of the Gothic': Spectral Women and Colonized Spaces in Lord Jim."  The Conradian 17.2  (Spring 1993): 1-16.
  • "Empire, Narrative, and the Feminine in Conrad's Lord Jim and Heart of Darkness." 
  • Contexts for Conrad.  Eds.  Keith Carabine, Owen Knowles, and Wieslaw Krajka.  East European Monographs.  Boulder: U of Colorado Press, 1993.  135-150.
  • "Post-Colonial Identity and Gender Boundaries in Amitav Ghosh's The Shadow Lines." College Literature 19.3, 20.1 (Oct. 1992, Feb. 1993): 225-228.
  • "Narrative Strategy and Imperialism in Conrad's Lord Jim."  Studies in the Novel 24.2 (1992): 173-186.

Poems:

  • “Vaishnu Devi,” “Almost True,” “New Delhi, Atrani.” Moving Worlds 4:1 (Summer 2004). 
  • “The Dead Ones.”  Catamaran.  January 2004.  31. 
  • "Words for Angela Carter," in InvAsian: Asian Sisters Present.  Ed. Elaine H. Kim. Berkeley: Study Center Press, 2003.  64. 
  • "Ghazal."  in Ravishing DisUnities: Real Ghazals in English.  Ed. Agha Shahid Ali.  Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, October 2000. 
  • “Again a Dream of Water."  Women and Language XVII  No.1 (Spring 1994): 47.

Children’s Book:

  • Pchak, Pchak: A Story of Crocodiles.  New Delhi: Young Zubaan.  2008.   

Creative Nonfiction/Memoir:

  • “Sister Hyacinth.”  South Asian Review 27.3 (Fall 2007): 156-64.

Presentations

Recent Presentations: 


 • “Whose India? Identity and the Indian Artist in a Global Market.” Plenary at the 2nd Annual Postcolonial Anglophone Literatures Conference. Tucuman, Argentina. November 2007.

• Roundtable discussion. “The Future of Postcolonial Studies.” Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. August 2004. • “Making Indian Literature.” Lecture at Oxford Brookes University, Publishing Seminar Series. May 2004. • Guest lecturer on Conrad at Jesus and Mary College, New Delhi. January 2003.

• “Marketing Indian Fiction.” University of Maryland Modernist Symposium. October 2002.

• Poetry Reading at the Poetry at Noon series at the Library of Congress. October 2002.

• "Who Reads Indian Fiction?" Universities of Oviedo and of Vigo, Spain. March 2000.

• "The Colonial and Postcolonial Novel." Sri Venkateswara College, Delhi University. January 2000.

• "Rereading Conrad's Lord Jim." Gargi College, Delhi University. January 2000. 

Course Information

  • Introduction to Literary Theory
  • The Adventure Novel in Colonial and Postcolonial Contexts
  • Introduction to Literature, Food
  • The Study of Fiction
  • The Gothic Novel
  • Nineteenth-Century British Literature
  • Indian Fiction in English
  • Indian Women Writing in English
  • Postcolonial Theory
  • Literature of the British Empire
  • African and Caribbean Women Writers
  • Women and Literature
  • Literature and Exile
  • Contemporary Postcolonial Literature and Theory
  • Charlotte Bronte and Autobiography
  • Joseph Conrad