Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College

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Courses Offered
Theatre

THEATRE MAJOR—REQUIRED COURSES

110. Foundations of World Theatre. (A) (NW) Every Semester

This course is designed to foster a global understanding of the composite art of theatre and the diverse history and cultures that have gone into its development. By examining some of the major achievements of theatrical arts, from their origins to the 18th century, including performance conventions, theories of acting, dramatic literature and criticism, and architecture, students will learn to recognize how meaning is constructed in the theatre. Sherman, Silberman

121. Stagecraft. (A) Every Fall

This course is designed and intended to impart to the student a basic understanding of the many different technical theatre processes. Combined, these processes are “STAGECRAFT.” Course content will include reading assignments, lectures, demonstrations and hands-on training in the form of lab work utilizing the Theatre, Dance and Film fall productions as teaching and learning tools. Marenick

186. Acting I. (A) Every Semester

Introduction to basic theory and practice of acting with emphasis placed on the critical and creative theories and techniques to cultivate imagination, focus, embodied creativity, self-awareness, and script analysis. Acting projects include exercises, scenes, and monologues. Reading and writing assignments required. C. Davis, Sherman

225. Costume Design. (A) Fall 2013

The process of designing a costume from analyzing the script through the finished product. Examines the history of Western costume and other designers’ work. Projects will allow students to apply theory, technique and research in achieving their own designs. West

228. Scene Design. (A) Every Fall

Emphasizes the design process and the visual idea and analyzes designs and designers. Students prepare models and renderings of assigned productions. Projects will allow students to apply theory, technique and research in achieving their own designs. Same as ART 228. Whiting

229. Lighting Design. (A) Every Spring

Explores theoretical fundamentals of light and visual perception and the process of lighting design from concept through execution. Projects will allow students to apply theory, technique and research in achieving their own designs. Whiting

283. Playwriting I. (A) Fall 2013

Combining workshop, lecture, readings, class discussion, and writing exercises, this course explores the fundamentals of the art and craft of writing for the stage. Over the course of the semester students will continually investigate, analyze, and probe the nature and meaning of “drama” and “theatricality,” working out definitions of words/concepts such as character, spectacle, dialogue/ diction, thought, sound, and plot/structure/action in both theory and practice. Students will complete the first draft of a one-act play. Silberman

385. Production Studio. (A) Every Semester

Combines performance work in theatre with research and analysis relevant to the given production, including the work of actors, assistant directors, assistant designers and stage managers (0.5 credit per semester; may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Donovan, Sherman, Davis

386. Directing. (A) Fall 2014

A theoretical and practical investigation of the responsibilities and techniques of the director in the theatre. Classroom exercises are supplemented by selected readings in the history and theory of directing. Prerequisite: Theatre Origins, Acting I, Playwriting I, and either Scene/Lighting/Costume Design. C. Davis

495. Senior Seminar. (A) Every Fall

Designed as a culminating analytical and creative experience for senior majors, the course engages individual critical and aesthetic elements as a means towards integrating each student’s knowledge and experience of the various theatrical disciplines. C. Davis

COURSES IN ACTING AND DIRECTING

111. First-Year Seminar: Solo Performance. (A) (W) Fall 2013

This course will consider the poetics and politics of solo performance art. The course’s practical focus will be split between writing/theorizing on solo performance and the creation of original performance pieces.

186. Acting I. (A)

See under “Required Courses.”

287. Acting IIa: Shakespeare. (A) Silberman Every Semester Fall 2015

Theory and practice of acting techniques focused on skills necessary to understand and perform Shakespeare’s classical verse and action -based acting. Students will cultivate an understanding of their unique vocal and physical instrument. Audition techniques will be introduced. Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I. C. Davis

288. Acting IIb: Realism. (A) Spring 2015

Theory and practice of Stanislavski-based realism as explored through script analysis and performance of selected scenes and monologues. Students will cultivate an understanding of their unique vocal and physical instrument. Audition techniques will be introduced. Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I. C. Davis

289. Acting IIc: Presentational. (A) Fall 2014

Theory and practice of acting techniques needed to perform non-realistic scripts or to present realistic scripts in a non-realistic style. Students will cultivate an understanding of their unique vocal and physical instrument. Special emphasis may be placed on Commedia dell’Arte, Le Coq, bourgeois farce, absurdist clowning, Brechtian styles, and others. Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I. Staff

285. Acting IId: Special Topics. (A) Fall 2013, Spring 2014

Rotating subjects, for example: Musical Theatre, Acting for the Camera, Mime and Mask Work, Stage Combat, Devised Performance or Character-based Improvisation. (Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I). Acting IId: Special Topics Fall 2013 — Musical Theatre. This studio course synthesizes the techniques of vocal performance, acting, and physicalization through musical theatre exercises, solo, and duet repertoire study. Donovan

Acting IId: Special Topics Spring 2014 — Acting for the Camera

Building on techniques of live stage performance, this course will develop techniques of performance transmitted through audio-visual technology with a view to developing student skills in screen acting. The methodology will be project based and practical, with the students exploring through hands- on exercises, various concepts such as the semiotics of film language, the camera as audience, the impact of frame size on emotional projection and gesture, reaction shots, blocking and business, and vocal levels. Students will generate an end of the semester video/television project for public presentation. C. Davis and Moss

COURSES IN THEATRE STUDIES

250. Issues in Modern and Contemporary European Drama. (A) Spring 2014

A literary and theatrical examination of representative European Drama from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century to the present. The focus of this course centers on the era’s specific aesthetic movements and new theatrical forms. Silberman

251. Issues in Modern and Contemporary American Drama. (A) Fall 2014

A literary and theatrical examination of representative American Drama from the early twentieth century to the present, emphasizing developments since 1950. The focus of this study is on how and why Americans and American life have been depicted onstage as they have and the powerful effect this range of depictions has had on American identity and the American imagination. Same as AMS/ENG 251. Silberman

270. Studies in Women Playwrights/Women’s Roles. (A) Fall 2015

An examination of plays written in a variety of cultures or significant female roles written by men. Consideration is given to the political, social, and cultural conditions that foster or inhibit the production and performance of work by female playwrights. Texts will be chosen from a broad spectrum of dramatic world literature and feminist dramatic theory and criticism. Assignments include research presentations, collective performance projects, and some creative writing. C. Davis

271. Theatre and Dance of Asia. (A) Spring 2015

An examination of non-Western performance traditions in select Asian countries, and of the societies from which these important theatre, drama, and dance forms and practices emerged. C. Davis

272. Solo Performance Art. (A) Spring 2015

This course will consider the poetics and politics of solo performance. We will contemplate the spectacle of a lone individual on stage and the ways in which his or her singularity produces a specific mode of theatricality. This course’s practical focus will be split between writing/theorizing on solo performance and the creation of original performance pieces. Silberman

274. Political Theatre and Social Change. (A) Spring 2016

This course examines how theatrical performance addresses current events and encourages consciousness and social change. This course will explore theories and practices of political theatre- making throughout history and examine the efficacy of theatre as an agent for social change. C. Davis

276. Shakespeare in Performance. (A) Fall 2015

This course focuses on film adaptations of the plays of William Shakespeare: film version whose main goal is not to transcribe live performances of the plays (as is the case for most TV productions) but to “translate” the dramas into cinematic language. Both texts and films will be analyzed from interdisciplinary and international perspectives. C. Davis

277. Special Topics. (A)

Rotating subjects offered, such as Musical Theatre, African Drama, Dramatic Theory, The Phenomenology of Stage Presence, Ancient Theatre and Performance, Offending the Audience, or Theatre and Religion.

277. Special Topics in Theatre Studies: Musical Theatre (A) Fall 2013

This course will survey the foundations and development of the American musical. Through the 192 study of cultural histories, play texts, and criticism the staging and endorsing of musicals will be explored. Donovan

ELECTIVES

273. Dramatic Adaptation. (A) Spring 2015

Combining workshop, class discussion, readings and screenings, this course explores the art, craft and theory of adaptation for stage or screen. Silberman

275. Writing the Short Film. (A) Fall 2014

Combining workshop, lecture, readings, class discussion, and screenings, this course explores the fundamentals of the art and craft of writing for the short film. Over the course of the semester students will investigate and probe the nature and content of three types of short film scripting procedures (documentary, experimental, and narrative) working out particular and common traits, strategies, and methodological approaches to script making both in theory and practice. Silberman

383. Playwriting II. (A) Spring 2014

An upper level writing workshop, exploring advanced concepts and theories of writing for the stage. Students will complete the first draft of a full-lenth play. Prerequisite: Playwriting I or instructor permission. Same as ENG 383.

490. Independent Study. (A) Every Semester

Independent study directed by the Theatre, Dance and Film staff. Permission of chairperson.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2013–2014

Acting Musical Theatre.
Studies in Musical Theatre.
Acting for the Camera.
Artisanal Cinema.
Documentary History and Theory.
The Films of Clint Eastwood.
Imag(in)ing Nature. Information/Vision/Design.
Film Noir.