Franklin & Marshall College Franklin & Marshall College

Courses Offered
Music

A list of regularly offered courses follows. The indication of when a course will be offered is based on the best projection of the department and is subject to change.

Please note the key for the following abbreviations: (A) Arts; (H) Humanities; (S) Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP) Natural Science in Perspective; (NW) Non-Western Cultures requirement; (W) Writing requirement.

COURSES IN MUSIC HISTORY/CULTURE AND THEORY

100. Fundamentals. (A) Every Semester

A first course in music for students with little or no formal training or background. Emphasis on basic musicianship, including keyboard orientation and the ability to read and sing simple melodies in treble and bass clefs, in both major and minor modes and in a variety of meters. Additional topics include the notation of pitch and rhythm, scales, key signatures, time signatures, intervals, triads and basic score navigation. No musical background is required. Wright

101. Introduction to Music. (A) Fall 2013

Survey of Western art music designed to develop perceptive listening, with emphasis on the study of rhythmic, melodic and harmonic organization, color, texture and form. No musical background is required. Leistra-Jones

102. Introduction to World Music. (A) (NW) Fall 2013

Survey of music from a global perspective with emphasis on the study of music’s relation to culture. Includes cross-cultural comparison of music’s rhythmic, melodic and harmonic organization, in addition to color, texture and form. Features case studies from Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. No musical background required. Students who already read music should enroll in MUS 229.) Alajaji

105. Jazz. (A) Spring 2014

The origin of jazz, from its roots to the present day, with emphasis on stylistic distinctions. Considers African and European contributions, blues types, New Orleans jazz, Harlem Stride, Swing, bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, free jazz, fusion, neo-classical and acid jazz, touching on most major figures and their contributions. Each stylistic period is studied from an economic and sociological viewpoint with emphasis on form, texture, improvisation, harmony, rhythm and timbre. Butterfield

106. History of the Blues. (A) 2014 – 2015

Blues history from its origins to the Blues Revival of the 1960s. Emphasis on the Delta blues tradition of Charley Patton, Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters. Additional topics include: oral formulaic composition; politics of race and sex in the blues; the blues as a “secular religion”; the music business; appropriations of blues style in jazz and rock; the ongoing function of the blues as a core signifier of “blackness” in American culture. Same as AFS 106. Butterfield

107. First-Year Seminar: Composing. (A)(W) Every Fall

Various aspects of the compositional process will be examined both through the study of composers’ writings and works and the creation of several short original pieces for various instrumentations. Ability to read music required. Carbon

215. Composition. (A) 2014 – 2015

Fundamentals of musical composition based on appropriate models. Projects for solo instrument, voice or small ensembles will emphasize individual elements of music: form; rhythm; melody; harmony; and texture. Prerequisite: MUS 100, MUS 222, or permission of the instructor. Carbon

222. Theory 1: Basic Harmony and Form. (A) Every Fall

Beginning with a review of fundamentals, the course covers harmonization in four parts, voiceleading, modulation and the composition of short binary pieces or variations. Prerequisite: MUS 100 or permission of the instructor; should be taken concurrently with MUS 224. Carbon

223. Theory 2: Advanced Harmony and Form. (A) Every Spring

Chromatic harmonic practices, including enharmonic modulations and altered chords. Composition and analysis of rondo or sonata forms. Prerequisite: MUS 222; should be taken concurrently with MUS 225. Carbon

224. Musicianship 1. (A) Every Fall

The course develops ear-training by way of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation, sight-singing and beginning harmonization at the keyboard. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor; should be taken concurrently with MUS 222 (one half credit). Butterfield, Norcross

225. Musicianship 2. (A) Every Spring

A continuation of Music 224. Additional topics include modulation and score reading. (Prerequisite: MUS 224 and permission of the instructor; should be taken concurrently with MUS 223 (one half credit). Butterfield

228. Middle Eastern Music and Culture. (A) (NW) Fall 2013

This interdisciplinary course will explore the musical identities of the Middle East and North Africa in terms of the complex sociological, historical, and political processes that have shaped the region. We will proceed from the idea that music is a powerful agent in the negotiation of power and identity, and examine the ways in which it has been utilized throughout transformative periods of history. Particular attention will be given to the transnational and diasporic nature of the musics under consideration. Classical, folk, and popular musical traditions will be considered, as will the roles of art, popular culture, and mass media. Same as IST 228. Alajaji

229. Music in Cultural Perspective. (A) (NW) Spring 2014

A study of the notion and role of music in selected music cultures. After exploring key concepts associated with music’s universal functions, the course will study rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, harmony, form and transmission from a cross-cultural perspective. Prerequisite: Ability to read music. Alajaji

230. Music History 1: Antiquity to 1750. (A) Every Fall

Western art music from early Gregorian chant through the florid art of the Baroque period. Includes the major stylistic developments as found in the works of Josquin, Monteverdi, Bach, Handel and other composers. Prerequisite: Ability to read music. Leistra-Jones

231. Music History 2: 1750 to Present. (A) Every Spring

The stylistic development of Western art music in the Classical, Romantic and Modern eras. Selected works from each era are the focal point of the study. Prerequisite: Ability to read music. Leistra-Jones

235. Popular Musics and Societies. (A) Spring 2014

This course will survey selected popular musics from around the world. Our goal is to understand these musics as phenomena of time and place and to engage them in their cultural contexts, examining the way they encounter the political, historical, and social realities of the societies that produce them. Genres to be studied include hip-hop, reggae, Afropop, bhangra, nueva canción, and American folk. Prerequisite: Ability to read music. Alajaji

238. Song Cycles. (A) Spring 2014

Song cycles—collections of songs unified by a common theme, narrative, or viewpoint—often tell stories. Specifically, the tell stories of individuals’ journeys (both inward and outward), transformations, and changing impressions, and they do so not only through poetry, but also through music. This course examines representative song cycles from three important moments in cultural history: German Romanticism (the early nineteenth century), the fin-de-siècle (the years surrounding 1900), and the 1960s and 70s. Within these periods we will examine cycles by a wide range of composers, including Beethoven, Schumann, Mahler, Elgar, George Crumb, and Joni Mitchell. Throughout, our emphasis will be on different conceptions of human subjectivity and the relationship between music and poetry. Prerequisite: MUS 100 or equivalent or permission. Leistra-Jones

315. Orchestration. (A) 2014–2015

Covers the ranges, capabilities and characteristic uses of orchestral instruments through exercises, score study and listening, and implements this knowledge in transcriptions and arrangements for a variety of ensembles in a variety of historical styles. Pre-requisites: MUS 223 or permission. Carbon

322. Counterpoint. (A) Spring 2014

The art of 18th-century counterpoint will be studied through the analysis of masterworks by J. S. Bach and others. Beginning with species and invertible counterpoint, followed by canonic writing, compositions will then include short binary pieces, inventions and fugues. Prerequisite: MUS 223 or permission of the instructor. Carbon

323. Theory 3: Chromatic and Post-Tonal Vocabularies. (A) Every Fall

Analytical study of the rhythmic, harmonic and formal practices of Debussy, Stravinsky, Bartók, Schoenberg, Messiaen and other composers of the last century. Includes atonal and serial music, with an introduction to set theory. Composition of short pieces using course materials. Prerequisite: MUS 223 or permission of the instructor. Carbon

430. Music Criticism. (A) Fall 2013

A seminar studying various genres of writing about music including musical diaries, analyses, musicological essays, program notes and reviews of performances. Major works being performed in New York City or on campus provide the central repertory for the seminar. Satisfies the writing requirement in the music major. Prerequisites: MUS 230, MUS 231, MUS 222, or permission of the instructor. Staff

490. Independent Study. Every Semester

Independent study directed by the music staff. Permission of the chairperson.

COURSES IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE

240. Conducting. (A) Every Spring

Develops skills in conducting, including score study, conducting gestures, aural discrimination skills and rehearsal strategies. Final project is to rehearse and conduct a performance of a large College ensemble. Course includes an individual weekly lesson and two weekly master classes. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Norcross

One half credit for participation in the following performing ensembles is accumulated over any consecutive two-semester sequence and is awarded at the end of the second semester of participation; students who wish to receive credit should enroll in the 100-level course in the first semester of participation and the 200-level course in the second.

150, 250. The Franklin & Marshall College Chorus. Every Semester

A large choral group of approximately 80 singers that concentrates on the masterpieces of the choral repertory, both a capella and with orchestra. Two rehearsals per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the director. W. Wright

151, 251. The Franklin & Marshall Chamber Singers. Every Semester

A select vocal ensemble of 24 singers selected by audition. Repertory includes music from a wide range of musical styles and time periods. In addition to on-campus performances, the group embarks on annual tours. Two rehearsals per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the director. W. Wright

152, 252, 352, 452. The Franklin & Marshall Orchestra. Every Semester

A full orchestra with approximately 70 performers focusing on masterpieces of the orchestral repertoire. Two rehearsals per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the director. Norcross

153, 253. 353, 453. The Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Every Semester

A large ensemble for woodwinds, brass and percussionists with approximately 50 performers. Repertory ranges from masterworks of the concert band tradition to new works written for wind ensemble. Two rehearsals per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the director. Norcross

155, 255. The Jazz Ensemble. Every Semester

Performs music from big band to progressive jazz. Prerequisite: Permission of the director. Laboranti

156, 256. Chamber Music. Every Semester

Chamber Music is designed for advanced instrumental music students to experience music written for generally 3 to 8 players. These small ensembles require high artistic demands of all of the ensemble members, as each player is essentially a soloist. Ensembles in this program rehearse a minimum of twice a week for a total of not less than three hours a week. One of the two rehearsals each week is coached by a professional chamber music coach. The ensemble is expected to perform in an appropriate concert at least once a semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the director. Hall-Gulati

157, 257. African Drum Ensemble. Every Semester

An ensemble of up to 20 performers focusing on West African drumming techniques and the philosophy behind them. Two rehearsals per week Prerequisite: Permission of the director. Hessen

In addition to the credit-bearing courses above, faculty-directed, non-credit performance opportunities such as opera workshop and the pep band are also a part of musical life at the College.

Studio lessons receive one half credit per semester and, at the 200 level, may be repeated.

The semester before a Senior Recital (only), students may enroll for lessons at the 300 level as “Recital Preparation” (e.g., MUS 385 Recital Preparation: Voice). Prerequisite: a minimum of two semesters of credit-bearing lessons in the same instrument at the 200 level.

The semester of a Senior Recital (only), students may enroll for lessons at the 400 level as “Senior Recital” (e.g., MUS 485 Senior Recital: Voice). Prerequisite: one semester of Recital Preparation at the 300 level.

280 A. Flute. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Flute. Admission by audition with the instructor. Trolier

280 B. Oboe. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Oboe. Admission by audition with the instructor. Deemer

280 C. Bassoon. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Bassoon. Admission by audition with the instructor. Buchar

280 D. Clarinet. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Clarinet. Admission by audition with the instructor. Hall-Gulati

280 E. Saxophone. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Saxophone. Admission by audition with the instructor. Laboranti

281 A. Trumpet. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Trumpet. Admission by audition with the instructor. Laudermilch

281 B. Horn. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Horn. Admission by audition with the instructor. Pfaffle

281 C. Low Brass. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Low Brass. Admission by audition with the instructor. Brown

282 A. Violin. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Violin. Admission by audition with the instructor. Jamanis

282 B. Viola. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Viola. Admission by audition with the instructor. Staff

282 C. Cello. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in ’Cello. Admission by audition with the instructor. Male

282 D. Double Bass. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Double Bass. Admission by audition with the instructor. Howell

283. Percussion. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Percussion. Admission by audition with the instructor. Yingling

284 A. Piano. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Piano. Admission by audition with the instructor. Keller

284 B. Jazz Piano and Improvisation. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Jazz Piano and/or jazz improvisation (any instrument). Admission by audition with the instructor. Cherner

285. Voice. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Voice. Admission by audition with the instructor. Geyer, Noël

286. Guitar. Every Semester

Private lessons and masterclass in Voice. Admission by audition with the instructor. Banks

The Music Department also offers private non-credit lessons for a fee in the above areas through its “Artist/Teacher Program.” Students with a financial aid package may request the Student Aid Office to take this fee into account in their aid award.

TOPICS COURSES EXPECTED TO BE OFFERED IN 2013 – 2014

Bebop.
Global Pop.
Performing Self in Music.