Pragmatism in a Deep Shade of Blue: John Dewey and the Question of Race in the United States

September 12 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Mayser Gymnasium

  • Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Department of African American Studies and Department of Religion,  Princeton University

Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is an historian of religion at Princeton University and one of America’s top scholars on African American religion, literature, and race and politics in America. His best-known books, Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul (2016), and In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America (2007), examine black communities to reveal deep complexities, vulnerabilities, and opportunities for hope. Dr. Glaude’s research interests include American pragmatism, specifically the work of John Dewey, and African American religious history and its place in American public life. It is this side of his research he will presenting at Common Hour, with a talked entitled “Pragmatism in a Deep Shade of Blue:  John Dewey and the Question of Race in the United States.”   

Professor Glaude is a scholar who has always taken care to engage non-academic audiences of all ages and backgrounds to engage about the burning social and political issue of our nation. His academic work is closely connected to his sense of himself as a public intellectual driven by a commitment to think carefully with others in public. Dr. Glaude has become a familiar media personality through his columns for Time Magazine and his regular appearances on radio and television news programs like Democracy Now!, Morning Joe, and the 11th Hour. He is currently writing on a book about James Baldwin, with the working title James Baldwin’s America, 1963-1972. We expect his talk to be solid intellectual meat, fueled by ethical passion, with a lively exchange in the question and answer period.

This event was proposed by Stephen Cooper and is sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies and the Africana Studies Program.
Common Hour enables the entire Franklin & Marshall College community to gather for culturally and academically enriching events at midday each Thursday during the academic year. This opportunity to engage in a campus-wide dialogue originates with Common Hour and then extends beyond the confines of 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. into classrooms, house commons, dining halls and beyond.