Associate Professor of Biology, Department Chair of Biology

717-358-3887

pynen.zbber@snaqz.rqh

Office: Office: LSP 332D

Education

B.A. Loyola College
Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Research

Mouse models for Down syndrome, effects of trisomy on cardiovascular, skeletal, and other systems during development.

Grants & Awards

2011 Benedict-Miller Foundation, Research Grant.

Publications

Blazek JD, AM Malik, M Tischbein*, ML Arbones, CS Moore, RJ Roper. 2015. Abnormal mineralization of the Ts65Dn Down syndrome mouse appendicular skeleton begins during embryonic development in a Dyrk1a-independent manner. Mechanisms of Development 136:133-42.

Lorandeau CG, LA Hakkinen and CS.Moore. 2011. Cardiovascular development and survival during gestation in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome. Anatomical Record 294:93-101. Free PMC Article

Moore CS, C Hawkins, A Franca, A Lawler, B Devenney, I Das and RH Reeves. 2010. Increased male reproductive success in Ts65Dn "Down syndrome" mice. Mammalian Genome 21:543-549. Free PMC Article

Williams AD, CH Mjaatvedt, and CS Moore. 2008. Characterization of the cardiac phenotype in neonatal Ts65Dn mice. Developmental Dynamics 237:426-435. DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.21416

Moore CS and RJ Roper. 2007. The power of comparative and developmental studies for mouse models of Down syndrome. Mammalian Genome 18:431-443. Link to pdf

Moore CS. 2006. Postnatal lethality and cardiac anomalies in the Ts65Dn Down syndrome mouse model. Mammalian Genome 17:1005-1012 with cover illustration. Link to pdf

Presentations

2009  Moore CS.  Teaching research skills through collaborative research projects in developmental biology. Society for Developmental Biology Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

2008    Moore CS, M Demczko, N Gotlieb and L Hakkinen. Development of cardiovascular defects in the murine Ts65Dn Down syndrome model. Mammalian Genome Conference. Prague, Czech Republic

2008  Demczko M, N Gotlieb, L Hakkinen and CS Moore. Characterization of cardiovascular development in the murine Ts65Dn Down syndrome model.  AnEUploidy Workshop, Geneva, Switzerland. Selected platform presentation.

Student Collaborations

Student Presentations at Research Conferences:

Franca A, Kelly EM and CS Moore. Proteomic identification of protein misexpression during cardiogenesis in the Ts65Dn Down syndrome mouse model. 2011 Mouse Genetics Conference, Washington, D.C.

Tischbein M and CS Moore. Evaluation of skeletogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome at embryonic day 13.5-14.5. 2011 Mouse Genetics Conference, Washington, D.C.

Kelly EM, MM Demczko and CS Moore. The effect of gene dosage imbalance and NFATc1 localization on endocardial cushion development in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome. 2009 Society for Developmental Biology Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Gotlieb NR, LA Hakkinen and CS Moore.  Quantification and analysis of apoptosis in embryonic atrioventricular endocardial cushions of the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome. 2009 Weinstein Cardiovascular Development Conference, San Francisco, CA.

Lorandeau CG and CS Moore.  Analysis of cardiovascular development and transmission rate during development in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome. 2009 Weinstein Cardiovascular Development Conference, San Francisco, CA.

Hakkinen LA and CS Moore. Embryonic cardiovascular analysis in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome. 2007 Pan American Congress in Developmental Biology, Cancun, Mexico. Honorable mention, Student Best Poster Contest.

Williams AD and CS Moore. Analysis of cardiovascular anomalies in the Ts65Dn mouse model for Down syndrome. 2007 Society for Developmental Biology Mid-Atlantic Conference, Princeton, NJ.

Rush LM, CM Mulcahy and CS Moore. Structural and protein analysis of mouse Ts65Dn embryonic stem cells differentiating into cardiomyocytes. 2004 Society for Developmental Biology, Northwest Regional Conference, Friday Harbor, WA.

Course Information

BIO 220 Principles of Physiology and Development
BIO 230 Cell Biology
BIO 306 Developmental Biology
FND 185 Impact of Reproductive Technology