Blood Born Pathogen & Biohazards

Cleaning Blood and other Bodily Fluid Spills Safety and Effectively

Disclaimer: The procedure below does NOT apply to health care workers, which are subject to the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standard. Employers subject to this standard must provide additional training on exposure prevention, handling and labeling of infectious waste. More requirements maybe needed. For janitorial or custodial workers outside of healthcare, the training requirements are not required.

Materials List:

Procedure for Spills on Hard, non-porous surfaces:

The cleanup and decontamination is a 3 step process requiring proper personal protection equipment, removal of gross filth (visible material), followed by disinfection of the surface.

Step 1: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Consider wearing appropriate face and eye protection when splashes, sprays, spatters, or droplets of blood or OPIM pose a hazard to the eye, nose, or mouth. Remove immediately or as soon as feasible any garment contaminated by blood or OPIM, in such a way as to avoid contact with the outer surface.

A blood spill, vomit, feces, urine and other bodily fluid spills are more than an inconvenient mess. In a home, school, or workplace, cleaning blood spills may pose health risks if the spill is contaminated with infectious agents. Proper cleanup procedures reduce these risks.

  • 2 or more plastic trash bags with ties.
  • Impervious gloves, preferably disposable gloves.
  • Eye protection
  • Disinfectant* (must be effective on HIV, Heptatitus B and/or TB.)
  • Absorbent (paper towels, diatomaceous earth or other solid absorbent).

Step 2: Clean up Gross Filth:

Isolate the Area: Block off the area of the body fluid spill to prevent further spreading.

Cover the spill with absorbent paper towels to avoid stepping in it. Alternatively a solid absorbent material can be spread over the surface. Carefully wipe up the spill with the paper towels and carefully place the mess in a plastic bag. Spray surface with an appropriate cleaner- disinfectant, then wipe up area with paper towels. If a wet/dry vacuum is used, start with an empty vacuum, and please note the vacuum should be disinfected per the procedure below.

Step 3: Decontaminate Surfaces and Disposal of Waste Disposal and Equipment Clean-Up

Decontaminate Surface: Apply properly diluted disinfectant to the surface and leave it visible wet. Allow to air dry.

Dispose of Waste: Double-bag all towels, absorbents, and gloves and tie the bags closed. Dispose of the double-bagged materials in the garbage and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water.

Disinfect Re-usable Equipment: Any equipment used in this process should be disinfected with one of the properly diluted disinfectants.


Carpet Care:

Carpet poses an even greater challenge because it is absorbent and cannot technically be disinfected. EPA registered disinfectants apply to hard, non-porous surfaces. If you choose to use a disinfectant on carpet, be certain that it has little or no color, otherwise it could stain the carpet.

When dealing with bodily fluid spills on carpet, follow this procedure:

Step 1: Follow Step 1 Above

Step 2: Clean up Gross Filth:

Isolate the Area: Block off the area of the body fluids spill to prevent further spread.

Cover the spill with absorbent paper towels to avoid stepping in it. Alternatively a solid absorbent material can be spread over the surface. Carefully wipe up the spill with the paper towels and carefully place in a plastic bag. Spray surface with an appropriate cleaner, and then wipe up area with paper towels. If a wet/dry vacuum is used, start with an empty vacuum, and please note the vacuum should be disinfected per the procedure below.

Step 3: Decontaminate Surface: Apply a carpet spotter / cleaner to the surface to fully cover the exposed area. If you choose to use a disinfectant, be certain that it will not stain the carpet.

Extract: You should use a hot water extractor to remove cleaner and residue from the carpet.

Apply an enzyme base product to the exposed area and allow to air dry. This will help to mitigate any residual odors.

Disposal and Equipment Clean-Up:

Dispose of Waste: Double-bag all towels, absorbents, and gloves and tie the bags closed. Dispose of the double-bagged materials in the garbage and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water.

Disinfect Re-usable Equipment: Any equipment used in this process should be disinfected with one of the properly diluted disinfectants. Carefully emptying collected contents into a toilet. Take about 1 gallon of diluted EPA registered disinfectant and run through the machine by suctioning through the vacuum hose. Spray the brushes and undercarriage with properly diluted disinfectant solution and allow to air dry.