9/03/2021 PHILLIPS MUSEUM OF ART

Magnum Photographers: Capturing Moments

  • Elliott Erwitt (French/American, b.1928). Pennsylvania Dutch & Adidas Santa Cruz, 1975. Gelatin silver print, 14 x 11”. Gift of Howard L. Ganek, P’86, 4111. Image Credit: Elliott Erwitt (French/American, b.1928). Pennsylvania Dutch & Adidas Santa Cruz, 1975. Gelatin silver print, 14 x 11”. Gift of Howard L. Ganek, P’86, 4111.
 Rothman Gallery: September 7-December 10, 2021

It was in 1947, and the years directly following WWII that Magnum was created. It was through a shared experience of hardship and devastation that four documentary photojournalists joined together to create a collective that focused on moments of humanity captured on film. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa, George Rodger and David “Chim” Seymour, the founding members of Magnum, were all deeply affected by the horrors of covering WWII assignments, or suffering through imprisonment and loss. They proposed the creation of a photography organization that supported the artist’s choice of projects that fit their interests rather than predetermined assignments and acknowledged that the photographers would retain copyrights to their own images; a revolutionary approach at the time.

During the first years of the collective, the founding artists split up the globe into coverage areas, much of which had not been photographed before. Images were sold to popular publications such as Life Magazine and National Geographic. From the liberation of concentration camps to 9/11, Magnum photographers have been documenting historic events for the past 70 years, covering famine, war, poverty, art, family, and celebrity so that the intangible, fleeting moments of life are captured. - Their work is based in social equality and human rights; exposing the effects of injustice on marginalized communities. This exhibition highlights ten members of the Magnum cooperative and the vast span of the globe and content that these photographers covered, and in some cases, died for.

Curated by Lindsay W. Marino, Phillips Museum Director & Collections Manager and Janie M. Kreines, Curator of Academic Affairs & Community Engagement.

 Thumbnail Image Credit: Burt Glinn (American, 1925–2008). Buddhist Temple, Kyoto, 1961. Gelatin silver print, 9 ⅜ x 6 ⅜”. Gift of Dr. Stephen J. and Eileen Nicholas, P'20, BGJP-035.2.

Opening Reception: September 30 at 5pm in the Rothman Gallery

Photojournalism Workshop: November 4 at 4:30pm at the Philadelphia Alumni Writers House

 

  • Burt Glinn (American, 1925–2008). Native American Family–a Nunumaiute mother holding baby, Alaska, 1953. Gelatin silver print, 9 ⅜ x 6 ⅜”. Gift of Dr. Stephen J. and Eileen Nicholas, P'20, BG-192. Image Credit: Burt Glinn (American, 1925–2008). Native American Family–a Nunumaiute mother holding baby, Alaska, 1953. Gelatin silver print, 9 ⅜ x 6 ⅜”. Gift of Dr. Stephen J. and Eileen Nicholas, P'20, BG-192.
  • George Rodger (British, 1908–1995). Men in robes, Northern Sudan, c. 1948.
Gelatin silver print, 7 3/4 x 9 ¾”. Gift of Dr. Stephen J. and Eileen Nicholas, P'20, GRM3467. Image Credit: George Rodger (British, 1908–1995). Men in robes, Northern Sudan, c. 1948. Gelatin silver print, 7 3/4 x 9 ¾”. Gift of Dr. Stephen J. and Eileen Nicholas, P'20, GRM3467.

 

 

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