11/01/2012 Magazine Staff

Steinman Foundation Grant Enables Students to Connect with Community

  • Susan Dicklitch, professor of government and director of the Ware Institute for Civic Engagement, discusses what it means to be a good citizen with members of her 400-level “Citizenship” course, a community-based learning course that examines the concept and practice of citizenship. (Photo by Eric Forberger) Susan Dicklitch, professor of government and director of the Ware Institute for Civic Engagement, discusses what it means to be a good citizen with members of her 400-level “Citizenship” course, a community-based learning course that examines the concept and practice of citizenship. (Photo by Eric Forberger)


Franklin & Marshall students are creating new knowledge in classrooms and laboratories throughout campus, and thanks to the support of the James Hale Steinman Foundation, some are also tackling social issues that affect the Lancaster community.

In July, the College received a two-year, $100,000 grant from the Steinman Foundation to create F&M Works in Lancaster, a pilot program that funds paid student internships with local nonprofit organizations at no cost to the organizations. Created by F&M’s Ware Institute for Civic Engagement, the initiative formally launched Sept. 17, when 20 students began 24-week Steinman Internships in the fields of business development, communications, public health, refugee resettlement, social services and education. The grant will support 40 internships for F&M students in the 2013-14 academic year.

The Ware Institute collaborated with F&M’s Office of the President, Office of Student and Post-Graduate Development, Office of Financial Aid and other groups on campus to develop the program over the summer.

A wide range of local organizations submitted requests to participate in the program, including Lancaster General Health, Church World Service, Community First Fund, Domestic Violence Services and the School District of Lancaster.

F&M Works in Lancaster is ideal for students who have been awarded work-study as part of their financial aid package at F&M, but all sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to apply, said Susan Dicklitch, professor of government and director of the Ware Institute. Federal work-study funds will cover a portion of the cost of the program for those on financial aid.

“F&M Works in Lancaster was developed with a focus on a sustainable, long-term engagement between F&M and the Lancaster community,” Dicklitch said. “The program is perfect for students who want to engage in meaningful work that adds a real-world dimension to their classroom learning and helps them prepare for life after college.”


The Ware Institute, which launched in 2000, recruits and serves hundreds of F&M students interested in community-based learning, K-12 tutoring or teaching, and community service. More than 75 percent of F&M students engage in some type of community service during their undergraduate years, and the Ware Institute sponsors or coordinates the majority of those opportunities.

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