12/15/2015 Peter Durantine

Psychology Symposia Showcase Students' Team-Based Research

In the final week of each semester, Franklin & Marshall's Department of Psychology conducts Collaborative Research Symposia to showcase student-team projects on a variety of psychological phenomena.

The department's collaborative research courses are organized around teams of two to four students. Each team is asked to design, conduct, analyze, interpret and report on original, empirical research on developmental or cognitive psychology.

Psychology's curriculum is designed to shape students to succeed in this demanding task, said John Campbell, emeritus professor of psychology. In addition, the collaborative nature of the research helps psychology majors appreciate the dynamics and benefits of the team-based approach to work and research that they increasingly will encounter after F&M.

At this year's event, held Dec. 8, 20 student teams presented the results of their research through either 15-minute oral presentations or poster-and-discussion sessions.

The project subjects ranged from "Homelessness on College Campuses" and "Does Music Help Children with Developmental Disorders Better Identify Emotions Than Visual Aid?" to "Differences in Chinese Students' Susceptibility to Self-Objectification after Priming in English vs. Mandarin Language" and "Hopelessness, Depression and Academic Procrastination." 

This slideshow presentation captures moments of that evening.

View slideshow: 

  • Aspiring psychology majors listen and question fellow students' projects. Aspiring psychology majors listen and question fellow students' projects. Image Credit: Deb Grove
  • Students Rachel Felder, Zoe Finiasz, Jenny Friedman, Tessa Grebey and Kelseyleigh Reber discussion their project, "Influence of Human Intruder Familiarity and Sex Upon Aggression and Anxiety in Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus paella)." Students Rachel Felder, Zoe Finiasz, Jenny Friedman, Tessa Grebey and Kelseyleigh Reber discussion their project, "Influence of Human Intruder Familiarity and Sex Upon Aggression and Anxiety in Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus paella)." Image Credit: Deb Grove
  • Kathy Doung, Hunter Siegrist and Tina Yin present their poster, "The Relationship Between the Big Five Inventory and Perceived Parenting Style for First-Years." Kathy Doung, Hunter Siegrist and Tina Yin present their poster, "The Relationship Between the Big Five Inventory and Perceived Parenting Style for First-Years." Image Credit: Deb Grove
  • Student project posters are displayed throughout the offices of the Psychology Department. Student project posters are displayed throughout the offices of the Psychology Department. Image Credit: Deb Grove
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