10/27/2017

My Fulbright Experience: Sophomore Corey Kreidler

With an interest in biology and animal welfare, Franklin & Marshall sophomore Corey Kreidler received a 2017 Fulbright Summer Institutes Fellowship to the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom.

“I learned a lot about wildlife conservation in the U.K. in my field biology class,” Kreidler said. “On our many field trips, I learned new survey techniques such as how to trap small rodents and how to identify various plant species.”

  • Kreidler with a rodent captured for study. Kreidler with a rodent captured for study.

Kreidler visited Raystede Center for Animal Welfare in the East Sussex village of Ringmer. The center functions as a sanctuary for retired farm animals as well as a shelter for adoptable dogs, cats, and rabbits.

“The center strongly emphasized the importance of animal welfare by giving all of their animals large enclosures,” he said. “One of the most interesting things I learned was that England no longer has any whales or dolphins in captivity. At one point, the U.K. had over 300 dolphins in captivity, but by the early 1990s, all dolphin aquariums had shut down because of increasing unpopularity by the public. While cetacean captivity is not illegal, U.K. laws have made it more expensive and difficult to keep whales and dolphins in aquariums.”

“These are exactly the types of things I hoped to learn more about while I was in the U.K. as they fuel more questions for me about what can be done with captive animals here in the United States,” Kreidler said. “I really want to go to graduate school in the U.K. so I can take advantage of the great animal-welfare programs they have there.”

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