Where Science and Philosophy Intersect 

The Scientific and Philosophical Studies of Mind program at F&M engages students in interdisciplinary reflection on the nature and functioning of the human psyche.

Students delve into current debates from multiple perspectives, employing intellectual tools adopted from Philosophy, Psychology, Biology, Computer Science and beyond. This diverse approach enables students to achieve a deeper level of understanding than any single discipline alone could provide.

In SPM you will join a new breed of faculty, energized and invigorated by interdisciplinary conferences, discussion groups, and a cooperative speaker program.

The SPM program is housed in the new Barshinger Life Sciences and Philosophy building, which physically bridges the historical academic divide between the sciences and the humanities by placing Philosophy together with the Biology and Psychology departments.

Established in 1996, SPM is funded by some of the most esteemed organizations in the world, including the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education. This level of support indicates both the quality the program provides and the level of resources available within it. It is staffed jointly by members of the Philosophy and Psychology Departments.

Lessons from the 2016 Election: What We Got Right, What We Got Wrong, and What It Means for 2018 and Beyond
Story 1/25/2018

Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion

Paul Bloom, Brooks & Suzanne Ragen Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science, Yale University

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Story 1/23/2017

Study: Apes’ Memories Are Enhanced by Watching Humans...

At Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, an F&M professor and four colleagues examined memory retention in chimpanzees and western lowland gorillas. They found the apes remember the actions of a live model...

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Story 4/28/2016

Senior Spotlight: Discovering a Community Where Lasting...

Kaitlin Oliver: "I’ve had excellent relationships with my professors. They’ve helped me grow intellectually throughout my four years."

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