F&M Summer Sessions: Available Courses

Home / Summer Sessions / F&M Summer Sessions: Available Courses

American Studies

AMS 239: Hip Hop: The Global Politics of Culture

Who gets to be "real" in hip hop? Why does being "real" matter? This course examines hip hop's "politics of authenticity," which opens avenues to help us speak about colonialism, white supremacy, sexism, and Black cultural resistance. Rightfully centering and honoring the genre's Afro-diasporic influences, we will examine debates involving transnationalism, gender, sexual, and racial boundaries in hip hop. We will also explore hip hop's global relevance, such as its sonic and cultural presence in reggaetón and its spread as a global dance form. Overall, this class will prompt students to untangle hip hop's seemingly contradictory ethos of "keeping it real" while simultaneously promoting broader ideals of cosmopolitanism and global commodification. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Mark Villegas

Course Reference Number: 30024

AMS/ENE 274: America Eats: Food, Nature, Sustainability

Food, broadly understood, offers novel approaches to understanding American history and culture. In particular, as a distinctly conjoined American way of living (our consumer society), and an American way of relating to the natural world. Encountering myriad perspectives through readings, multi-media, and experiential learning excursions, we will on one type of “wicked problem” — sustainability — and how a more mindful understanding of food can offer deeper understanding of ourselves, living in America, and our shared future. Same as ENE274. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 30025

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 40068

Anthropology

ANT 100: Social Anthropology

An examination of fundamental categories and practices in social anthropology, giving special attention to anthropological methodologies, basic forms of social organization, and the ways human beings generate particular social meanings through their aesthetic, economic, religious, and political activities. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I 

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Christina McSherry

Course Reference Number: 30027

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Christina McSherry

Course Reference Number: 40070

ANT 102: Intro to Archaeology

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of prehistoric archaeology. We will examine how knowledge about the past is created, debated, and sometimes abused. We will survey world prehistory from the earliest hominids through the rise of the first "civilizations" to expose the range of variation in past human social and political organization. By adopting a global and comparative approach, we will develop a better understanding and appreciation for this diversity. As we learn about the messages and lessons that archaeology has to offer we should begin to think critically about our own society and reflect on the possibilities for its improvement. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Scott Smith

Course Reference Number: 30028

ANT 274: The Anthropology of Food

Across the globe, food is not only consumed for mere sustenance but is an integral part of both everyday and sacred contexts. This course examines how food is deployed in constituting families; in the making of religious identities; in the moral judgments of others; in symbolizing social and economic inequality. With particular attention to taboos and ideas of disgust, we will think through how we eat connects to who we are in relation to others. Pre-reqs: ANT 100 or permission of instructor. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Christine Chalifoux

Course Reference Number: 40071

Art, Art History and Film

ART 103: Learning to See: Art Histories

How do we see the past? What do the objects produced in the past tell us about the transformation of visual experience over time? And how do we, in the modern age, tell the stories of those objects? This course introduces students to the questions art historians ask, the methods they use, and the works they study, focusing on the Western tradition from Antiquity to the present day. While the course spans more than 2000 years, it complements breadth with case studies focusing on conditions of making art, as well as the social, political and cultural contexts of cultural production. Students learn skills in looking, the analysis of visual form, and writing about what they see, skills that lay a foundation for future study in art, art history as well as many other disciplines. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Gloria Mast

Course Reference Number: 30002

ART 116: Introductory Sculpture

An introduction to how ideas and meaning can be transmitted through three-dimensional forms and materials and to the basic processes involved in the creation of the sculptures that convey those concepts. Materials include clay, wood, metal and mixed media; techniques include modeling, carving and fabrication (basic carpentry and welding). The work of sculptors, both historical and contemporary, will be examined and discussed. Students will be charged a fee for materials in this course. A Materials fee of $75 is required. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Caitlin Bishop

Course Reference Number: 30003

SUMMER SESSION II

IN-PERSON HYBRID

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Amy Boone-McCreesh

Course Reference Number: 40052

ART/ENG142: Digital Photography I

Emphasizes making well thought-out artistic statements with the camera. Digital photography offers many of the same practices found in traditional photography, from camera settings with depth of field, ISO speeds and optimal exposure, to reading natural and artificial light. Concentration on potential for aesthetic enhancement, manipulation and storage in the digital darkroom as well as consideration of slides of master photographs and the different genres and approaches available to the artist photographer. Does not supply complete information on all aspects of digital photography or new commercial photographic media. Students will be charged a fee for materials in this course. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I 

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 7 - 9:30 p.m.

Instructor: John Holmgren

Course Reference Number: 30001

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 7 - 9:30 p.m.

Instructor: John Holmgren

Course Reference Number: 40051 

ART 265: Contemporary Graphic Novel

In this course, we will develop an historical, aesthetic, and formal understanding of contemporary graphic fiction. We'll study the genre's antecedents in early comics, the interplay of the comics and their historical and cultural contexts, graphic fiction's engagement with high art, and the formal elements of graphic texts. Readings will include comics and graphic literature from 1986 to the present, including Maus I and II, Watchmen, Fun Home, Jimmy Corrigan, Embroideries, Killing and Dying, and other graphic texts. Meets contemporary requirement for the English major. Same as ENG 265. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Instructor: Kerry Sherin-Wright

Course Reference Number: 30049

FLM/ENG/TND 374: Writing the Feature Film

Combining workshop and class discussion this course explores the nuances of the art and craft of feature-length screenwriting. Students will learn the process of discovering and creating stories suitable for feature films, exploring how characters are formed by the story and also dictate it. At the end of the class, each student will have completed a draft of a full-length, feature film screenplay in professional format. Same as TND/FLM 374. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Brian Silberman

Course Reference Number: 40078

Biology

Business, Organizations, and Society

BOS 224: Accounting for Decision Making

This course is now full. 

Accounting concepts, standards, and procedures involved in income determination and asset, liability, and owners' equity measurement and reporting. Emphasis on the role of accounting information in investing decisions. Pre-req: BOS200 (may be taken concurrently with BOS224) Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Staff

Course Reference Number: 30005

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Staff

Course Reference Number: 40053

BOS 250: Quantitative Methods

Gives students the tools necessary to engage in research as well as the ability to read and understand the research done by others. Includes an exploration of the scientific method, theory construction, hypothesis development, and statistical tests used to evaluate them. Focus is on the issues in the social sciences, particularly business organizations. Not open to students who have taken BIO 210, ECO 210, GOV 250, MAT 215/216, PSY 230, PSY300, or SOC 302. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jorida Papakroni

Course Reference Number: 30007

BOS 272: Brand Management

This course will cover the key attributes of tourism management in terms of theory and practice. Specific emphasis will be placed on the tourism activity related to Eastern Europe, Asia, Scandinavia and Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jessica Keech

Course Reference Number: 40054

BOS/JST 275: Business in Israel and the Middle East

This course examines business development, entrepreneurship and collaboration in the Middle East. Specifically, this course looks at Israeli start-ups as well as successful start-ups in other Middle East nations such as the UAE and Bahrain. It also examines business cases where people of different ethnic and religious backgrounds have come together to work in tandem to reach common goals, including Israelis and Palestinians. Same as JST 275. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jeff Podoshen

Course Reference Number: 30008

BOS 278: Digital Marketing Concepts

This course will help students understand the digital trends that are shaping the future, provide students with the opportunity to design a digital marketing plan, experiment with today’s digital marketing tools (licensed and free), and learn techniques to measure the ROI of their digital campaigns. Topics covered in this course include (but are not limited to): social media marketing, content marketing, website design, mobile marketing, search engine marketing, and email marketing. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jeff Podoshen

Course Reference Number: 40067

BOS 315: Organizational Behavior

Multidisciplinary study of the formal organization. Topics include concepts ad theories related to how individuals, groups, and structural attributes influence the performance of organizations. Prerequisite: BOS200. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Nicole Jones Young

Course Reference Number: 30010

BOS 332: Law, Ethics & Society

This course will explore the nature of individual obligation and professional accountability in our complex, commercial society. We will begin by examining the minimal social expectations embodied in legal doctrines and principles. We will then turn to explore our broader social responsibilities by drawing upon the norms and values necessary for a vibrant civil society. The aim is to gain a richer understanding of how to lead morally satisfying and civically engaged professional lives. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.

Instructor: John Garic

Course Reference Number: 30011

BOS 341: Marketing

Integrated, analytical approach to macro- and micro-marketing and marketing management. Problems and case studies are used to analyze marketing opportunities, strategic planning of profit, and not-for-profit organizations in accordance with a societal marketing concept. Open to juniors and seniors only. This course offering is aimed at bringing liberal arts content, skills, and pedagogies to the study of business. Prerequisites: BOS200 & BOS250. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jessica Keech

Course Reference Number: 30012

BOS 361: Securities Analysis

Formulation of investment policies for individuals, firms, and institutions; analysis of securities; operation of the securities markets. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jorida Papakroni

Course Reference Number: 30013

Classics

LAT 101: Elementary Latin I

Introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Latin. The aim of LAT101 is to develop a facility for comprehending written Latin. Students will not be required to speak Latin nor to understand spoken Latin. LAT101 is an introductory course and is normally open only to students who have had no prior experience in the formal study of Latin. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Gretchen Meyers

Course Reference Number: 40072

CLS 230: Classical Myth

Introduction to the myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their relationship to the art, history, philosophy and religions of their respective cultures. Students will explore the Classical conception of the interactions between mortals, heroes and divinities through a wide range of media and textual genres. Connections between Greek and Roman myths as well as the adaption of mythical traditions from Near East cultures will be discussed. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.

Instructor: Shawn O'Bryhim

Course Reference Number: 30032

Computer Science

CPS 111: Computer Science I

Introduces basic concepts in computer science and computational problem solving through the design of algorithms and computational processes,  odularization, and abstraction. Also introduces the processes of programming and software development as a means to put solutions into practice. Has a required lab, but does not satisfy the “Natural Science with Laboratory” requirement. 

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.; Lab: Tuesday & Friday, 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Jing Hu

Course Reference Number: 40083

Earth & Environment

ENE 117: Environment and Human Values

Study of historical and modern attitudes toward nature; human use of nature's resources; the effects of the growth of science and technology on human uses of and attitudes toward the environment; and modern humans' ability to substantially alter the environment (e.g., by altering global temperature). Key concepts addressed include the nature of human population growth, the notion of "limits to growth," and the difficulty of managing the use of common pool resources. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 7 - 9:30 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 30017

ENE 172: Intro to Earth & Environmental Science

This course, which replaces ENE 114 and ENE 110, will focus on understanding Earth, how it works and why we should care. Rocks and minerals record the passing of time, mark critical events in Earth’s history, and underpin modern economies and culture. Soils created by weathering cover continents and are fundamental to forests, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. Water flowing from higher ground to oceans shapes continental surfaces and makes spectacular waterfalls, gorges, and wetlands. We will study methods for understanding, characterizing, and forecasting Earth’s natural phenomena. We also will investigate how we generate and manage energy, natural resources, water, waste and all of the necessities and by-products of human civilization. The interdisciplinary nature of geoscience and environmental science is emphasized throughout the course. Laboratories and field components complement and extend the lecture material. Field trips enable first-hand observations of Earth’s physical, chemical, and biological processes, and how they relate to contemporary events on our planet, such as floods, landslides, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and climate change. Students cannot get credit for ENE 110 or 114 and ENE 172. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.; Lab: Monday & Thursday, 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: James Jolles

Course Reference Number: 40059

ENE/AMS 274: America Eats: Food, Nature, Sustainability

Food, broadly understood, offers novel approaches to understanding American history and culture. In particular, as a distinctly conjoined American way of living (our consumer society), and an American way of relating to the natural world. Encountering myriad perspectives through readings, multi-media, and experiential learning excursions, we will on one type of “wicked problem” — sustainability — and how a more mindful understanding of food can offer deeper understanding of ourselves, living in America, and our shared future. Same as AMS274. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 30026

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 40069

Economics

ECO 100: Intro to Economic Principles

An introduction to micro and macroeconomics. Neoclassical models of economic behavior, market structures, and aggregate economic performance. Topics include: supply and demand analysis; consumer and business behavior; market structures: (competition, monopoly, oligopoly) and failures: inflation and unemployment; government fiscal and monetary policies. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.

Instructor: Tony Maynard

Course Reference Number: 30021

ECO 200: Microeconomics

The analytical foundations of neoclassical price theory: theory of the consumer; theory of the firm; market structure and efficiency; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium. Prerequisites: ECO100 and ECO103 and MAT109 or MAT110. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.

Instructor: Tony Maynard

Course Reference Number: 40057

ECO 231: Money and Banking

Students will explore the basic principles of money, interest rates, balance sheets, financial instruments, financial institutions, and monetary policy. We will examine the nature and origins of money, the role of banks and nonbank financial institutions in the creation of money, and the relationship between banks and the central bank. Prerequisite: ECO100 and ECO103. This course will be offered asynchronously and online during Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Yeva Nersisyan

Course Reference Number: 30022

English

ENG/ART 265: Contemporary Graphic Novel

In this course, we will develop an historical, aesthetic, and formal understanding of contemporary graphic fiction. We'll study the genre's antecedents in early comics, the interplay of the comics and their historical and cultural contexts, graphic fiction's engagement with high art, and the formal elements of graphic texts. Readings will include comics and graphic literature from 1986 to the present, including Maus I and II, Watchmen, Fun Home, Jimmy Corrigan, Embroideries, Killing and Dying, and other graphic texts. Meets contemporary requirement for the English major. Same as ART 265. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Instructor: Kerry Sherin-Wright

Course Reference Number: 30034

ENG/FLM/TND 374: Writing the Feature Film

Combining workshop and class discussion this course explores the nuances of the art and craft of feature-length screenwriting. Students will learn the process of discovering and creating stories suitable for feature films, exploring how characters are formed by the story and also dictate it. At the end of the class, each student will have completed a draft of a full-length, feature film screenplay in professional format. Same as TND/FLM 374. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Brian Silberman

Course Reference Number: 40079

Entrepreneurship

INT 274: Entrepreneurial Thinking

Entrepreneurial thinking is a mindset that values ingenuity, the drive to find and create meaningful solutions to problems, and the willingness to learn from both success and failure equally. In that light, the main learning objectives of this course are: 1) to internalize the entrepreneurial mindset and be able to apply it on multiple dimensions of students' personal, academic, and professional lives; and 2) to acquire the tools necessary to evaluate and pursue entrepreneurial opportunities in any field. The course will introduce and follow the hypothesis-driven attitude towards entrepreneurship called “The Lean Startup" and will be complemented with real world examples and other startup related techniques. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Joaquin Villarreal

Course Reference Number: 40082

French and Francophone Studies

FRN 102: Elementary French II

Continuation of FRN101. Prerequisite: FRN 101 or placement. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Vanessa Borilot

Course Reference Number: 30038

Government

GOV 171: Power and Politics

This course provides an introduction to the field of Political Science, including the main concepts and themes related to power and politics at the individual, community, state, and international levels. Questions include: Why do we need states and governments? Whose interests are represented in political systems? When do different groups gain representation and power? Does democracy really help people, or are there other forms of government that work better? To what extent does the form of government affect the behavior of politicians? Not open to students who have taken GOV 100 or GOV 120. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m. 

Instructor: Stephanie McNulty

Course Reference Number: 30023

GOV 372: Political Economy of Development

This course examines the great divergence in wealth and power between global North and global South and modern efforts to overcome it. Topics covered include the alleviation of poverty, the provision of healthcare, education, and other services, the promotion of entrepreneurship, the importance of human rights and democracy, the role of knowledge in advancing economic and social well-being, and the effectiveness of the state in the changing world. We analyze experiences of different countries in Latin America, Africa, East Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Robert Shaver

Course Reference Number: 40058

History

HIS 137: American History, 1491-1865

Traces development of North America from the European encounter with the continent in 1490s to end of American Civil War. Examines colonization and its impact on the region’s indigenous peoples; the evolution of free and unfree labor systems; the causes, events, and consequences of the American Revolution; and the continental expansion of the New Republic. Concludes by examining political and cultural tensions between north and south, the rise of the Abolition movement, the Civil War, the revolution of Emancipation, and the first years of Reconstruction. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Ted Pearson

Course Reference Number: 30043

HIS/JST 170: Holocaust

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to one of the most important events in modern history, the destruction of European Jewry. To do so, we will situate the Holocaust, or Shoah, in its historical context, explore the nature of genocide, and consider a number of the moral and intellectual issues raised by the Holocaust. Throughout the course, we will pay special attention to the vulnerability of democratic institutions, the phenomenon of collaboration, and the roles of technology and bureaucracy. As students in this course you will critically explore a historical or cultural group and recognize how this exploration contributes to a broader understanding of values. The term “group” involves not only European Jewry but also the Sinti and Roma ethnicities, the Nazi perpetrators, the nations involved as bystanders, collaborators or (in a rare cases) as rescuers. We will also examine how the Holocaust is remembered and the power of its example: What lessons are to be derived? Same as JST 170. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Guillaume de Syon

Course Reference Number: 30044

HIS/PBH/STS 311: History of Medicine

The history of medicine with particular attention to American medicine. The relationship between medicine and society is studied in its historical context. We look in detail at some trends in modern medicine and the current debate over national health care policy in light of the history of medicine. Same as PBH/STS 311. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Instructor: Nick Bonneau

Course Reference Number: 40064

Judaic Studies

JST/HIS 170: Holocaust

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to one of the most important events in modern history, the destruction of European Jewry. To do so, we will situate the Holocaust, or Shoah, in its historical context, explore the nature of genocide, and consider a number of the moral and intellectual issues raised by the Holocaust. Throughout the course, we will pay special attention to the vulnerability of democratic institutions, the phenomenon of collaboration, and the roles of technology and bureaucracy. As students in this course you will critically explore a historical or cultural group and recognize how this exploration contributes to a broader understanding of values. The term “group” involves not only European Jewry but also the Sinti and Roma ethnicities, the Nazi perpetrators, the nations involved as bystanders, collaborators or (in a rare cases) as rescuers. We will also examine how the Holocaust is remembered and the power of its example: What lessons are to be derived? Same as HIS 170. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Guillaume de Syon

Course Reference Number: 30045

JST/BOS 275: Business in Israel and the Middle East

This course examines business development, entrepreneurship and collaboration in the Middle East. Specifically, this course looks at Israeli start-ups as well as successful start-ups in other Middle East nations such as the UAE and Bahrain. It also examines business cases where people of different ethnic and religious backgrounds have come together to work in tandem to reach common goals, including Israelis and Palestinians. Same as BOS 275. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jeff Podoshen

Course Reference Number: 30009

Mathematics

MAT 109: Calculus I

Introduction to the basic concepts of calculus and their applications. Functions, derivatives, and limits; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; integration. Prerequisite: Placement by the department or MAT105. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.

Instructor: Iwan Praton

Course Reference Number: 30015

MAT 110: Calculus II

Techniques of integration, applications of integration, separable first-order differential equations, homogeneous second-order differential equations, parametric equations in two dimensions, Taylor polynomials, and Taylor series. Prerequisite: MAT109 or placement. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.

Instructor: Heather Pasewicz

Course Reference Number: 40063

MAT 215: Introduction to Statistical Modeling

This course is about the construction, analysis, and application of statistical models to real data. We emphasize the use of models to untangle and quantify variation in observed data. Basic statistical concepts such as randomness, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, causal inference, etc., are explored in the context of statistical models which include multivariate regression, analysis of variance, and logistic regression. We use a modern statistics software package (R) throughout the course. Prerequisite: MAT109. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Danel Draguljic

Course Reference Number: 30006

MAT 216: Probability and Statistics I

Introduction to single variable probability and statistics. Random variables. Binomial, geometric, Poisson, exponential and gamma distributions, among others. Counting techniques. Estimation and hypothesis tests on a single parameter. Prerequisite: MAT110. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Danel Draguljic

Course Reference Number: 30004

Music

MUS 102: Introduction to World Music

Survey of music from a global perspective with emphasis on the study of music's relation to culture. Includes cross-cultural comparison of music's rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic organization, in addition to color, texture, and form. Features case studies from Africa, the Americas, Europe, and Asia. No musical background required. Students who already read music should enroll in MUS229. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 30042

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Eric Usner

Course Reference Number: 40076

Natural Science in Perspective (NSP)

NSP 137: History of Space and Time

This course traces the development of views on space and time, from classical Greece to the modern theory of pace and time, relativity. Students will gain a conceptual understanding of relativity as well as use algebra to work out detailed problems. We will discuss some of the revolutionary aspects of relativity such as black holes, the warping of space, time travel and the big bang. We will explore the philosophical implications of relativity, how our modern view of space and time has changed our view of the world and how it has influenced society, literature and art. This course will have a mix of synchronous and asynchronous meetings.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. and asynchronous

Instructor: Calvin Stubbins

Course Reference Number: 40055

Philosophy

PHI 100: Introduction to Philosophy

Traditional philosophical problems of method, knowledge, the nature of reality, religious belief, and ethics. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Michael McCourt

Course Reference Number: 40075

PHI 122: Intro to Moral Philosophy

Survey of attempts to understand the nature and significance of moral thought. Theories will be assessed in part in light of current controversies, which may include capital punishment, affirmative action, and the limits of state authority. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Instructor: David Merli

Course Reference Number: 30041

PHI 244: Symbolic Logic

Deductive reasoning, emphasizing primarily symbolic techniques; some discussion of issues in the philosophy of logic. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Nicky Kroll

Course Reference Number: 40074

Physics and Astronomy

PHY 111: Introduction to Mechanics

An introduction to fundamental physical principles governing mechanics, including trajectories, forces, Newton’s Laws, mechanical energy and momentum, circular motion, thermodynamics, oscillations, and waves. Laboratory work involves scientific reasoning, mathematical models, and uncertainty analysis. These topics will be covered in more depth and with more mathematical sophistication than in PHY101. This course is designed for physical science students and forms the foundation for subsequent courses in the physics and astrophysics majors. Students cannot earn credit for both PHY 111 and PHY 101. Corequisite: MAT 109. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.; Lab: Tuesday & Thursday 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Calvin Stubbins

Course Reference Number: 30016

PHY 112: Intro Electricity & Magnetism

An introduction to fundamental physical principles governing electricity and magnetism, including Coulomb’s Law, electric fields and potentials, magnetic fields, circuits, and optics. Laboratory work involves scientific reasoning, mathematical models, and uncertainty analysis. These topics will be covered in more depth and with more mathematical sophistication than in PHY102. This course is designed for physical science students and forms the foundation for subsequent courses in the physics and astrophysics majors. Students cannot earn credit for both PHY 112 and PHY 102. Prerequisite: PHY101 or PHY111; Corequisite: MAT 110. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.; Lab: Tuesday & Thursday, 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Debbie Schmidt

Course Reference Number: 40056

PHY 277: Harrison and Herschel: Expanding Science Through Instrument Making in the 1700s

Technology shapes our modern lifestyles. From personal communications, digital documentation, to the internet of things, modern lives differ from those of previous generations. Individuals, societies, and cultures each respond to evolving technologies. Students in this course will examine the effects that the clocks of John Harrison and the telescopes of William Herschel had on scientific thought and popular culture of their times, and extend these findings to contextualize the role of advancing technologies in the age of reason. Students will research historical disruption and counter social responses at the onset of the industrial revolution, examine the connections between scientific theory and evidence, and synthesize research findings in papers and presentations; these experiences will culminate with individual research projects. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. and asynchronous

Instructor: John Krebs

Course Reference Number: 30019

Psychology

PSY 100: Introductory Psychology

An experimental and conceptual analysis of the processes of learning, thinking, and perception, and the biological bases of behavior. The relationships of these to behavioral development, social behavior, and more complex phenomena of personality formation and abnormal behavior is undertaken. Required laboratory work involves investigation of the various processes in animals and humans. Students cannot earn credit for both PSY 100 and PSY 101 unless permission is obtained from the department. Offered in-person for Summer Session 1 and online for Summer Session 2 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Friday, 8 - 10 a.m.; Lab: Tuesday & Thursday, 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Todd DeKay

Course Reference Number: 30020

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Lab asynchronous.

Instructor: Krista Casler

Course Reference Number: 40061

PSY 202: Developmental Psychology

An examination of the relative contributions of nature and nurture on children's behavioral, cognitive, and perceptual development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Topics include the development of language, concepts, intelligence, socialization, motor abilities, and emotional understanding, with discussion informed by current and classic primary reading. Research activities and analyses integrated into course work. Prerequisite: PSY100 or SPM100. Previously PSY 304. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Krista Casler

Course Reference Number: 30047

PSY 203: Embodied Cognition

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Elena Cuffari

Course Reference Number: 40062

Public Health

PBH 251: Intro to Public Health

An introduction to public health, a field that endeavors to improve the health of the community through community-based action. The history of public health, how to measure community health, communicable diseases, chronic and lifestyle diseases, family health, nutrition and food safety, environmental health, the U.S. national health care system, underserved groups, public health law and ethics, and the future of public health. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Instructor: Nick Bonneau

Course Reference Number: 30014

PBH/HIS/STS 311: History of Medicine

The history of medicine with particular attention to American medicine. The relationship between medicine and society is studied in its historical context. We look in detail at some trends in modern medicine and the current debate over national health care policy in light of the history of medicine. Same as HIS/STS 311. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Instructor: Nick Bonneau

Course Reference Number: 40066

Religious Studies

RST 111: Intro to Religious Studies

This course asks the question: “What is religion?” It provides a variety of answers by examining theories of religion, and introduces students to core topics within the field of religious studies. Students will read a series of comparative anthropological and historical case studies organized into six units: ritual and rites of passage, pilgrimage and tourism, religion and the nation, spirit possession, messianic movements, and new age religion. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Sughra Husain

Course Reference Number: 30040

RST 114: Islam

This course is an introduction to the intellectual and political history of Islam in both pre-modern and contemporary times. Several major aspects of Islamic religious thought will be covered including the Qur‘an and its interpretation, the persona and prophetic authority of Muhammad, law and theology, law and gender, Islamic mysticism, and contemporary Muslim reform movements. We will use a range of sources including primary religious texts (all in translation), anthropological works, novels, films etc. to examine the diversity and complexity of Muslim thought and practice, both past and present. While focusing on Islam, this course will also familiarize students with larger conceptual questions and problems in the academic study of religion. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Sughra Husain

Course Reference Number: 30051

Science, Technology and Society

STS 173: The Occult, Magic, and Science

This course surveys the intellectual and social history of the occult sciences (astrology, alchemy, divination, etc.) and pseudoscience in Western Civilization and America from Antiquity to the present. The class will also discover ideas and claims made that mainstream scientific communities dismiss as outside the bounds of scientific inquiry or which do not follow certain scientific methods. One major theme of the course will be the continuing way in which societies have policed the boundary between what they define as "bunk" and what they dub legitimate "science." Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 7 - 9:30 p.m.

Instructor: Keith Miller

Course Reference Number: 40065

STS/PBH/HIS 311: History of Medicine

The history of medicine with particular attention to American medicine. The relationship between medicine and society is studied in its historical context. We look in detail at some trends in modern medicine and the current debate over national health care policy in light of the history of medicine. Same as HIS/PBH 311. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Instructor: Nick Bonneau

Course Reference Number: 40060

Sociology

SOC 100: Intro to Sociology

Introduction to the basic concepts, theories, and methods used to study human social interaction and social structures. Readings and topics vary section to section, but typically address social stratification (primarily by race, class, and gender) and its impact on individual and social life, the sources of social order and social change, deviance and social control, and the interrelations between individuals and society. Prerequisite to all other departmental offerings. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: John Flavin

Course Reference Number: 40073

Spanish

SPA 102: Beginning Spanish II

A continuation of Spanish 101. A $6 materials fee replaces the need for any additional textbook purchase. Prerequisite: SPA101 or equivalent. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Mery Soto-Harner

Course Reference Number: 30036

SPA 201: Intermediate Spanish I

Review of the Spanish language. Emphasis on oral communication, reading, writing, and culture. Introduction of literary and cultural texts. A $6 materials fee replaces the need for any additional textbook purchase. Prerequisite: SPA102 or placement. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Elena Aldea Agudo

Course Reference Number: 30035

Theatre and Dance

TND 186: Acting I

Introduction to basic theory and practice of acting with emphasis on the critical and creative theories and techniques to cultivate imagination, focus, embodied creativity, self-awareness, and script analysis. Acting projects include exercises, scenes, and monologues. Reading and writing assignments required. Offered in-person for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

IN PERSON

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Rachel Anderson-Rabern

Course Reference Number: 30037

TND 240: Dance and World Cultures

A study of non-Western dance forms and the cultural influences that have shaped them. Topics will include but are not limited to dance as a form of oral tradition; dance as apart of religious ritual; and cultural perceptions of the body, beauty, and gender as revealed through dance performance. Offered asynchronously and online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION I

Online

Schedule: Asynchronous

Instructor: Jennifer Conley

Course Reference Number: 30050

TND/ENG/FLM 374: Writing the Feature Film

Combining workshop and class discussion this course explores the nuances of the art and craft of feature-length screenwriting. Students will learn the process of discovering and creating stories suitable for feature films, exploring how characters are formed by the story and also dictate it. At the end of the class, each student will have completed a draft of a full-length, feature film screenplay in professional format. Same as FLM/ENG 374. Offered online for Summer 2024.

SUMMER SESSION II

ONLINE

Schedule: Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Instructor: Brian Silberman

Course Reference Number: 40077

Ready to register?

If you'd like to take a course with F&M this summer, you will need to complete a registration form. You will need the course reference number for the course you'd like to register for. High school students who have not applied for admission to F&M will need to submit an official transcript to the Office of the Registrar. Guest students from other higher education institutions do not need to supply a high school or college transcript.

Register now »