Curriculum Overview 

The study of theatre at Franklin & Marshall College embraces all aspects of dramatic art as part of a liberal arts education. Interdisciplinary by nature, theatre studies allow all students to develop aesthetic responses and abilities in understanding and making dramatic works of art. The collective aesthetic and intellectual activities that make up the work of theatre, including reading, writing, discussing, creating and performing, help students develop skills necessary for useful, collaborative, and productive participation in society.

The theatre program at F&M integrates theory and practice as students develop historical knowledge and critical thinking skills and combine them with current practices in performance, playwriting, directing, design, and studies in drama.

Introductory courses, as well as departmental productions, are open to all College students, including those without previous theatre experience.

A major in Theatre for the classes of 2018 and 2019 consists of a minimum of 12 credits and the successful completion of at least two crew assignments.

TDF 110. Foundations of World Theatre.

TDF 121. Stagecraft.

TDF 186. Acting I.

TDF 225. Costume Design or TDF 228. Scene Design or TDF 229. Lighting Design.

TDF 283. Playwriting I.

Two Theatre Studies Courses: (Asian Theatre and Dance, Political Theatre and Social Change, Shakespeare in Performance, Studies in Women Playwrights/Women’s Roles, Studies in Modern & Contemporary American Drama, Studies in Modern & Contemporary European Drama, African-American Theatre, Special Topics)

TDF 386. Directing.

TDF 385. Production Studio (two at 0.5 credits each).

TDF 495. Senior Seminar.

Two crew assignments

Two electives (Acting II (a, b, c, d), Playwriting II, Writing the Short Film, Dramatic Adaptation, additional Theatre studies courses above the requirement, or additional Design courses above the requirement).

A major in Theatre for the classes of 2020 and 2021 consists of a minimum of 13 credits and the successful completion of at least two crew assignments.

TDF 110. Foundations of World Theatre.

TDF 121. Stagecraft.

TDF 186. Acting I.

TDF 225. Costume Design or TDF 228. Scene Design or TDF 229. Lighting Design.

TDF 283. Playwriting I.

Two Theatre Studies Courses: (Asian Theatre and Dance, Political Theatre and Social Change, Shakespeare in Performance, Studies in Women Playwrights/Women’s Roles, Studies in Modern & Contemporary American Drama, Studies in Modern & Contemporary European Drama, African-American Theatre, Special Topics)

TDF 386. Directing.

TDF 385. Production Studio (two at 1 credit each).

TDF 495. Senior Seminar.

Two crew assignments

Two electives (Acting II (a, b, c, d), Playwriting II, Writing the Short Film, Dramatic Adaptation, additional Theatre studies courses above the requirement, or additional Design courses above the requirement).

To be considered for honors in theatre, graduating seniors must meet the College’s general requirements for honors, with a project approved by at least two members of the theatre faculty.

Majors in the Department of Theatre, Dance and Film have studied abroad in the following programs in recent years: British American Drama Academy; London Dramatic Academy; University of London, Royal Holloway College, London; SIT, Prague, Czech Republic; IES, Milan and London; Laban, London, Bilkent Exchange in Ankara, Turkey; Interstudy University of Cape Town, South Africa; University of Glasgow, Scotland; ASE Bath, England; Queen Mary College at University of London, and National Theatre Institute at the O’Neill Theatre Center, Connecticut. See the International Programs section of the Catalog for further information.

A minor in Theatre consists of six courses and one crew assignment: Foundations of World Theatre, Acting I, Playwriting I, a design course (scene, lighting or costume), one theatre studies course, and one elective.

 

The studies offered by the Department of Theatre, Dance and Film (TDF) include dramatic literature, history and criticism; design, acting and playwriting; dance performance and studies; and film and media studies and production. Courses in dramatic literature, theatre art, dance and film/media studies meet distribution requirements either for Arts, Humanities, or Non-Western.

THEATRE

The study of theatre at Franklin & Marshall College embraces all aspects of dramatic art as part of a liberal arts education. Interdisciplinary by nature, theatre studies allow all students to develop aesthetic responses and abilities in understanding and making dramatic works of art. The collective aesthetic and intellectual activities that make up the work of theatre, including reading, writing, discussing, creating and performing, help students develop skills necessary for useful, collaborative, and productive participation in society.

The theatre program at F&M integrates theory and practice as students develop historical knowledge and critical thinking skills and combine them with current practices in performance, playwriting, directing, design, and studies in drama.

Introductory courses, as well as departmental productions, are open to all College students, including those without previous theatre experience.

A major in Theatre consists of a minimum of 12 credits and the successful completion of at least two crew assignments.

TDF 110. Foundations of World Theatre.

TDF 121. Stagecraft.

TDF 186. Acting I.

TDF 225. Costume Design or TDF 228. Scene Design or TDF 229. Lighting Design.

TDF 283. Playwriting I.

Two Theatre Studies Courses: (Asian Theatre and Dance, Political Theatre and Social Change, Shakespeare in Performance, Studies in Women Playwrights/Women’s Roles, Studies in Modern & Contemporary American Drama, Studies in Modern & Contemporary European Drama, African-American Theatre, Special Topics)

TDF 386. Directing.

TDF 385. Production Studio (two at 0.5 credits each).

TDF 495. Senior Seminar.

Two crew assignments

Two electives (Acting II (a, b, c, d), Playwriting II, Writing the Short Film, Dramatic Adaptation, additional Theatre studies courses above the requirement, or additional Design courses above the requirement).

To be considered for honors in theatre, graduating seniors must meet the College’s general requirements for honors, with a project approved by at least two members of the theatre faculty.

Majors in the Department of Theatre, Dance and Film have studied abroad in the following programs in recent years: British American Drama Academy; London Dramatic Academy; University of London, Royal Holloway College, London; SIT, Prague, Czech Republic; IES, Milan and London; Laban, London, Bilkent Exchange in Ankara, Turkey; Interstudy University of Cape Town, South Africa; University of Glasgow, Scotland; ASE Bath, England; Queen Mary College at University of London, and National Theatre Institute at the O’Neill Theatre Center, Connecticut. See the International Programs section of the Catalog for further information.

A minor in Theatre consists of six courses and one crew assignment: Foundations of World Theatre, Acting I, Playwriting I, a design course (scene, lighting or costume), one theatre studies course, and one elective.

DANCE

The dance major prepares dancers to move, create, analyze, write about and evaluate dance as an expression of the individual, of culture and of history. It features a balanced curriculum of performance-based and theory-based courses, while all courses address both studio and analytical components of topics covered.

A major in Dance consists of 11 credits as stipulated: eight dance courses demonstrating a balance between performance and theory work, such that four courses focus on performance (technique and composition, listed under “Performance Focus” below) and four on history, theory and analysis, listed under “Analytical Focus”; TDF 320 (Kinesiology for Dance) and 331 (Dance History) must be among the analytical courses); the TDF capstone course, TDF 495 (Senior Seminar); an additional two TDF classes to be selected from other dance electives or entry-level acting, design, theatre studies, media studies, or other dance electives as approved by the Dance Program director; and 40 hours of technical crew work. At least three courses must be taken at or above the 300-level. Students wishing to study off campus should consult with dance faculty members and the Office of International Studies. Students seeking admission to graduate school in dance should consult with faculty advisers about additional courses to further prepare them for that direction.

Students may develop a Joint Major in dance and another field in consultation with the Dance faculty adviser. Templates for such a major are currently available for dance and biology, history, or psychology. Those students wishing to propose a Joint Major between dance and fields other than the three listed should meet with the heads of these programs (dance and the proposed field) to determine an appropriate program of study. For joint majors, 30 hours of technical crew work is required.

A minor in Dance consists of six course credits in dance: three from the “Performance Focus” course list and three from the “Analytic Focus” course list, as approved by the department chairperson. Dance minors must complete 20 hours of technical crew work.

FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES

The Film & Media Studies program explores all aspects of visual communication and expression. Students in our program make movies—narrative, documentary, and experimental. They study movies as cultural and historical artifacts. And they think deeply about how moving images work—as art, entertainment, technology, commerce, and a powerful instrument for discovering and sharing knowledge and ideas.

A major in Film and Media Studies consists of 11 courses:

TDF 165. Introduction to Film and Media Studies

TDF 262. Fundamentals of Motion Picture Production

TDF 267. Film History

TDF 363. Film Theory Seminar

TDF 467. Thesis Project in Film and Media Studies

Two of the following production workshops:

TDF 362. Narrative Video Workshop

TDF 364. Documentary Video Workshop

TDF 367. Experimental Video Workshop

One additional 300-level film history, criticism, or theory course.

Plus three electives in Film & Media Studies and related subjects approved by the program director. Automatically approved electives include TDF courses in writing, acting and design (186, 225, 228, 229, and 283), Videodance, and film courses in other departments (e.g., Italian Cinema, Cinema and the American Jewish Experience). Film History (343), Film Theory (363) and the 300-level video production workshops (362, 364, 367) may be repeated as electives. Students with an interest in interdisciplinary research involving Film & Media Studies (e.g., arts management, visual anthropology, movies for social change, the psychology of cinema) may petition the program director to include courses from other departments as electives within the major.

A minor in Film and Media Studies consists of six courses. These include the following four courses:

TDF 165. Introduction to Film and Media Studies

TDF 262. Fundamentals of Motion Picture Production

TDF 267. Film History

TDF 363. Film Theory Seminar

Plus two other Film & Media Studies courses or any of the electives described above as part of the major.

Theatre Courses

A list of regularly offered courses follows. Please note the key for the following abbreviations: (A) Arts; (H) Humanities; (S) Social Sciences; (N) Natural Sciences with Laboratory; (LS) Language Studies requirement; (NSP) Natural Science in Perspective; (NW) Non-Western Cultures requirement; (W) Writing requirement.

THEATRE MAJOR—REQUIRED COURSES

110. Foundations of World Theatre. (A) (NW)

This course is designed to foster a global understanding of the composite art of theatre and the diverse history and cultures that have gone into its development. By examining some of the major achievements of theatrical arts, from their origins to the 18th century, including performance conventions, theories of acting, dramatic literature and criticism, and architecture, students will learn to recognize how meaning is constructed in the theatre.    

E. Cizmar

121. Stagecraft. (A)

This course is designed and intended to impart to the student a basic understanding of the many different technical theatre processes. Combined, these processes are “STAGECRAFT.” Course content will include reading assignments, lectures, demonstrations and hands-on training in the form of lab work utilizing the Theatre, Dance and Film fall productions as teaching and learning tools.    

R. Marenick

186. Acting I. (A)

Introduction to basic theory and practice of acting with emphasis placed on the critical and creative theories and techniques to cultivate imagination, focus, embodied creativity, self-awareness, and script analysis. Acting projects include exercises, scenes, and monologues. Reading and writing assignments required.           

R. Anderson-Rabern, E. Cizmar, C. Davis

225. Costume Design. (A)

The process of designing a costume from analyzing the script through the finished product. Examines the history of Western costume and other designers’ work. Projects will allow students to apply theory, technique and research in achieving their own designs.    

V. West

228. Scene Design. (A)

Emphasizes the design process and the visual idea and analyzes designs and designers. Students prepare models and renderings of assigned productions. Projects will allow students to apply theory, technique and research in achieving their own designs. Same as ART 228.  

 D. Holmes

229. Lighting Design. (A)

Explores theoretical fundamentals of light and visual perception and the process of lighting design from concept through execution. Projects will allow students to apply theory, technique and research in achieving their own designs.    

D. Holmes

283. Playwriting I. (A)

Combining workshop, lecture, readings, class discussion, and writing exercises, this course explores the fundamentals of the art and craft of writing for the stage. Over the course of the semester students will continually investigate, analyze, and probe the nature and meaning of “drama” and “theatricality,” working out definitions of words/concepts such as character, spectacle, dialogue/diction, thought, sound, and plot/structure/action in both theory and practice. Students will complete the first draft of a one-act play.    

B. Silberman

385. Production Studio. (A)

Combines performance work in theatre with research and analysis relevant to the given production, including the work of actors, assistant directors, assistant designers and stage managers (1 credit per semester; may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.            

C. Davis,  R. Anderson-Rabern, E. Cizmar

386. Directing. (A)

A theoretical and practical investigation of the responsibilities and techniques of the director in the theatre. Classroom exercises are supplemented by selected readings in the history and theory of directing. Prerequisite: Foundations of World Theatre, Acting I, Playwriting I, either Scene/Lighting/Costume Design, and one Production Studio.            

C. Davis, R. Anderson-Rabern

495. Senior Seminar. (A)

Designed as a culminating analytical and creative experience for senior majors, the course engages individual critical and aesthetic elements as a means towards integrating each student’s knowledge and experience of the various theatrical disciplines.      

C. Davis, R. Anderson-Rabern

 

COURSES IN ACTING AND DIRECTING

186. Acting I. (A)

See under “Required Courses.”

287. Acting IIa: Shakespeare. (A)

Theory and practice of acting techniques focused on skills necessary to understand and perform Shakespeare’s classical verse and action -based acting. Students will cultivate an understanding of their unique vocal and physical instrument. Audition techniques will be introduced. Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I.     

Staff

288. Acting IIb: Realism. (A)

Theory and practice of Stanislavski-based realism as explored through script analysis and performance of selected scenes and monologues. Students will cultivate an understanding of their unique vocal and physical instrument. Audition techniques will be introduced. Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I.     

Staff

289. Acting IIc: Presentational. (A)

Theory and practice of acting techniques needed to perform non-realistic scripts or to present realistic scripts in a non-realistic style. Students will cultivate an understanding of their unique vocal and physical instrument. Special emphasis may be placed on Commedia dell’Arte, Le Coq, bourgeois farce, absurdist clowning, Brechtian styles, and others. Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I.     

Staff

285. Acting IId: Special Topics. (A)

Rotating subjects, for example: Musical Theatre, Acting for the Camera, Mime and Mask Work, Stage Combat, Devised Performance or Character-based Improvisation. (Prerequisite: TDF 186: Acting I).  

Staff

 

COURSES IN THEATRE STUDIES

250. Issues in Modern and Contemporary European Drama. (A)

A literary and theatrical examination of representative European Drama from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century to the present. The focus of this course centers on the era’s specific aesthetic movements and new theatrical forms.    

B. Silberman

251. Issues in Modern and Contemporary American Drama. (A)

A literary and theatrical examination of representative American Drama from the early twentieth century to the present, emphasizing developments since 1950. The focus of this study is on how and why Americans and American life have been depicted onstage as they have and the powerful effect this range of depictions has had on American identity and the American imagination. Same as AMS/ENG 251.     

B. Silberman

 

ELECTIVES

383. Playwriting II. (A)

An upper level writing workshop, exploring advanced concepts and theories of writing for the stage. Students will complete the first draft of a full-length play. Prerequisite: Playwriting I or instructor permission. Same as ENG 383.     

B. Silberman

490. Independent Study. (A)

Independent study directed by the Theatre, Dance and Film staff. Permission of chairperson.    

Staff

 

Dance Courses

 

COURSES IN DANCE: PERFORMANCE FOCUS

116. Introduction to Modern Dance. (A)

The practice of modern dance technique, integrating movement experience with study of the philosophies and theories that have shaped the art and its practice.    

J. Conley

117. Introduction to Ballet. (A)

Basic technique and theory of ballet, including the anatomical laws governing ballet movement and investigation of the style and aesthetic of ballet technique. The course emphasizes the practice of dancing as well as that of writing, thinking and speaking clearly about ballet.    

L. Brooks

200201 and 300301. Dance Production Ensemble I and II. (A)

Credit for work undertaken toward performance in at least two College productions in the course of one academic year. Students are cast in choreographies by audition. They study, read and write about techniques, theory and history appropriate to mastery of the work in progress. Class/rehearsal and performance participation are mandatory. For TDF 200 and 300, students receive no credit, but a full credit is awarded for the completion of TDF 201 and TDF 301. Prerequisites: audition and permission of the instructor.     

J. Conley, P. Vail

218. Intermediate Modern Dance Technique and Composition. (A)

A continuation of modern dance technique study, with further development of flexibility, strength and efficiency in movement. Fundamentals of dance composition are also studied. Ways that dance can communicate meaning are explored through reading, writing and movement assignments. Prerequisite: TDF 116 or permission of the instructor.    

P. Vail

219 and 319. Flamenco Dance I and II. (A)

Technique, rhythms and history of Flamenco dance in a studio format. TDF 319 has a prerequisite of TDF 219 or permission of the instructor.             

E. Hevia y Vaca

223. Introduction to West African Dance. (A) (NW)

African dance is an emanation of the lives of the people in this culture. Students learn, practice, perform, discuss, and write about the historical and cultural tradition of West African dance, with a focus on the dances of Guinea.

J. Peck

227. Intermediate Ballet. (A)

Continued study of ballet technique and theory. Class includes kinesiological applications as well as historical and compositional investigations. The course emphasizes not only the practice of dancing but also of writing, thinking and speaking critically and clearly about ballet. Prerequisite: TDF 117 or permission of the instructor.     

P. Vail

260. Compositional Improvisation. (A)

The practice of improvisation not only as a tool for choreography, but also as an art and performance form in itself, offering insightful experiences and discoveries. Students learn how to be fully present, both in body and in mind, making conscious choices and composing in the moment. Reading, writing and movement assignments support in-class practice. Prerequisite: TDF 116 or permission of the instructor.    

P. Vail

317. Advanced Modern Dance, Technique and Performance. (A)

A continuation of modern dance technique study, with further development of flexibility, strength and efficiency in movement. Investigating individual dynamism and nuance in movement—aspects of performance—is an essential aspect of coursework. Strategies that enhance, deepen and develop this practice are explored through reading and writing assignments and studio work. Prerequisite: TDF 218 or permission of the instructor.    

P. Vail

330. Choreography and the Creative Process. (A)

Investigation of choreographic problems and complex questions of artistry, based on reading, writing, discussion, feedback, movement exploration and performance. Questions asked include: What is creativity? How do we foster it for ourselves? Prerequisite: TDF 116 or permission of the instructor.     

P. Vail

490. Independent Study. (A)

Independent study directed by the Theatre, Dance and Film staff. Permission of chairperson.     

Staff

495. Senior Seminar. (A)

See description under Theatre Required Courses.

 

 

COURSES IN DANCE: ANALYTICAL FOCUS

220. Introduction to Movement Analysis. (A)

Introduction to concepts of movement analysis, including theoretical and practical investigations of effort, shape, space and the body in motion. Motif-writing, movement fundamentals, observational techniques and history of movement analysis are introduced through lecture, discussion and movement exploration.    

L. Brooks

238. Dance on the American Musical Stage. (A)

A lecture-survey, supplemented by studio experiences, of musical stage dancing in America from the colonial period to the present. Dance styles covered include acrobatic, ballet, ballroom, melodrama, exotic, folk, jazz, modern and tap. Same as AMS 238.    

L. Brooks

240. Dance and World Cultures. (A) (NW)

A study of non-Western dance forms and the cultural influences that have shaped them. Topics will include but are not limited to dance as a form of oral tradition; dance as a part of religious ritual; and cultural perceptions of the body, beauty and gender as revealed through dance performance. Class formats include lecture, discussion and studio sessions.     

J. Conley

244. Sound and Movement. (A)

Study of the relationship between sound and movement as it pertains to making dance, as well as the collaborative partnership of composers and choreographers. Through lecture, discussion, movement exploration and composition, students examine a variety of roles that music plays in the dance world, develop perceptive listening skills and undertake basic rhythmic and harmonic training. Prerequisite: TDF 116 or permission of the instructor.    

J. Conley

308. Writing Dance. (A)

Exploration of dance writing through literature (fiction and poetry), scenarios, dance journalism including criticism and dance and notation. In addition to writing about dance, students will realize, through movement, dance poetry and scenarios. Prerequisite: TDF 116 or permission of the instructor.     

L. Brooks

320. Kinesiology for Dance.

Study of the science of movement as it relates to dance, including basic anatomy and physiology, the physics involved in dancing and the mind-body connection responsible for producing and controlling movement. Lectures, discussions and movement focus on understanding how the body moves and on increasing movement efficiency to enhance performance and prevent injury.    

P. Vail

330. Choreography and the Creative Process. (A)

See text above, under Performance courses.    

P. Vail

331. History of Western Theatre Dance. (A)

Survey of the forces that have shaped and influenced stage dancing in much of Western Europe and the Americas beginning with the fifteenth century and moving into the contemporary periods. Class formats include lecture, discussions and studio sessions.     

J. Conley

345. Videodance. (A)

An intensive workshop investigating the relatively young art form of video dance. In addition to reading and writing assignments, coursework will entail analysis of existing dance films and creation of original works. Students will collaborate in all aspects of the creative process, which includes directing, choreography, filming, and editing. Prerequisite: TDF 116 or permission of the instructor.    

P. Vail

490. Independent Study. (A)

Independent study directed by the Theatre, Dance and Film staff. Permission of chairperson.

 Film and Media Studies Courses

165. Introduction to Film and Media Studies. (A)

An introduction to the way movies are put together, to basic critical terms and concepts used in the study of movies, videos and television and to the complex roles that cinema and television play in society—as art, business, entertainment and a medium of information and ideology.  

 D. Eitzen

213. Black American Film. (A)

An introduction to film studies using black film as a genre of Hollywood and independent film. Covers the work of Oscar Michaux through the “blaxploitation” films of the 1970s and beyond. Explores films as social commentary in their particular historical contexts. Particular attention is given to screen analysis of segregation, sexuality, class differences and more. Same as AFS/AMS/WGS 213.    

C. Willard

245. The History of Photography: The First 100 Years. (A)

An examination of the first 100 years of the medium from its invention to the documentary photography produced under the Farm Security Administration in the late 1930s. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of photography to the arts of painting and literature, as well as on contextualizing photographs as documents of scientific investigation, ethnographic research, social history and personal expression. Prerequisite: Strongly recommended that students have had at least one art history course. Same as ART 245.    

R. Kent

261. Writing for the Screen. (A)

Combining workshop, lecture, class discussion, and screenings, this course explores the fundamentals of the art and craft of writing for the screen. Over the course of the semester we will investigate the nature and content of three types of film scripting (documentary, experimental, and narrative), working out particular and common traits, strategies, and approaches to scriptmaking both in theory and practice.    

D. Eitzen

262. Motion Picture Production I. (A)

This course teaches video production basics through a series of short creative exercises in videography, location lighting, sound recording, non-linear editing, and video effects. This course is designed as a prerequisite for upper-level video production workshops (e.g., 362, 364). Same as ART 262.    

J. Moss

267. Motion Picture History. (A)

An introduction to doing history with movies. Treats movies from the 1890s to the 1960s. Provides an overview of the evolution of popular movies and of influential artistic and rhetorical counter-currents, including national film movements, experimental cinema and documentary. Same as ART 267.    

A. Comiskey

303. As Seen on TV: History as Media Event. (H)

“Where were you when . . .?” Whether the Kennedy assassination, Richard Nixon’s resignation, the shooting of Ronald Reagan or the fall of the Berlin wall, most Baby Boomer Americans would answer: “I was watching it on TV.” This course will explore the representation of history-making moments in the mass media, with a focus on the second half of the 20th century.  We will explore how television covered the event at the time, how that coverage shaped the first draft of history, and how it has participated in shaping the cultural memory of the event in the years since. Course units include Edward R. Murrow’s duel with Senator Joe McCarthy, the JFK assassination, Vietnam, Watergate, the O.J. Simpson case, and 9/11. Same as AMS 303.    

Frick

318. Media and Politics. (S)

Examines the role of the mass media (including print, broadcast, and new media) in American politics, giving particular attention to the ways in which the media both influence and are influenced by political actors and the political process. Prerequisite: GOV 100. Same as GOV 318.          

 S. Medvic

343. Motion Picture History Seminar. (A)

A seminar devoted to applying the methods of historical and cultural analysis to particular genres, periods, movements, or auteurs of motion pictures. Since the topic varies from term to term, this course may be repeated for credit. Recent offerings include “Hitchcock,” “The American New Wave,” “Bollywood Cinema,” “Film Noir,” “Surrealist Cinema,” and “The Films of Clint Eastwood.”    

A. Comiskey, D. Eitzen

356. Italian Film History. (A)

Introduction to Italian film history, with an emphasis on the relationship between cinema and society and culture. May include influential auteurs (Visconti, De Sica, Antonioni, Pasolini, Fellini) and movements (Neorealism, cinema politico), as well as popular forms (commedia all’italiana), genre films, experimental filmmaking, and documentary. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITA 310 or permission of the instructor. Same as ITA 356.    

G. Lerner

362. Narrative Video Workshop. (A)

An intensive workshop in visual storytelling. Students work in teams to develop, shoot and edit short narratives. This course requires an unusual amount of outside-of-class work. Prerequisite: TDF 262, “Fundamentals of Motion Picture Production.” Same as ART 362.  

 J. Moss

363. Film Theory Seminar. (A)

Advanced seminar devoted to applying classical and contemporary film theory to particular problems and movies. Topic varies from term to term. Same as ART 363.    

D. Eitzen, A. Comiskey

364. Documentary Video Workshop. (A)

An intensive video-production workshop, focusing on documentary as an art form, as a way of using video to explore and examine te world, and as a means of connecting with others. Prerequisite: TDF 262, “Fundamentals of Motion Picture Production.” Same as ART 364.

366. Italian Cinema and the Arts. (H)

Cinema has presented itself, since its very origins, as a synthetic form of art that could incorporate panting, architecture, sculpture, as well as music, literature, and dance. This course aims to explore the different ways in which inter-artistic dialogue has influenced the development of Italian cinema, determining the style of its major auteurs and contributing to the complexity of their films. A series of critical and theoretical readings will help us develop a solid interpretive approach to the films, which will include works by Fellini, Antonioni, Pasolini, Visconti, Rossellini, and other filmmakers. Normally taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITA 310 or permission of the instructor. Same as ITA 366.    

G. Lerner

367. Experimental Video Workshop. (A)

An intensive workshop in experimental filmmaking politics and poetics, this course focuses on avant-garde movements from the early 20th century to present-day. Experimental film generally strays from conventional forms and narratives, alternatively emphasizing painterly, expressive, political, and lyrical tendencies in moving images. Student projects will engage specific aesthetics and approaches studied in class through the creation of a series of original works. Prerequisite: TDF/ART 262 or permission of the instructor.    

J. Moss

467. Thesis Project in Film and Media Studies. (A)

A thesis project may be a creative work or a research project. Students may work individually or collaboratively with rare exceptions, thesis projects are spread over two semesters, in students’ senior year. The purpose of this course is to facilitate and coordinate students’ projects. There are certain required benchmarks each term: a pitch, a project schedule, a grant proposal or research prospectus, a research portfolio, formal presentations of work in progress, etc. Beyond that, students set their own goals and agendas. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Film and Media Studies majors must complete two semesters. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (one half credit)    
J. Moss

490. Independent Study.

Independent study directed by the Theatre, Dance and Film staff. Permission of chairperson.     

Staff

Topics Courses Expected to be Offered in 2017-2018

  • Intermediate/Advanced Modern Technique.
  • 16mm Filmmaking.
  • French Cinema and Culture.