Dig in to Anthropology

Franklin and Marshall is distinguished among private liberal arts colleges in having a free-standing and comprehensive Department of Anthropology that teaches cultural anthropology, archaeology, and linguistic anthropology. The curriculum is designed to ensure that all majors encounter anthropological theory and also get to participate in anthropological research.

Our students are among the colleges most avid participants in study abroad and we facilitate group and independent anthropological exploration at a virtually inexhaustible list of remote locations. Among other places, F&M Anthropology students have recently studied in Ireland, Russia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, China, Japan, Morocco, Senegal, and Ethiopia. Studying abroad has become an integral part of the Anthropology major for the majority of our students.

Beyond the classroom, The Anthropology Club sponsors films, speakers, and special events, and publishes The Kituhwan, a student journal. The department also maintains a close relationship with the North Museum, a natural historical collection located on the F&M campus. The Shadek-Fackenthal Library and the Martin Library of the Sciences also have excellent collections on anthropological subjects.

  • Natalia Valdes analyzing an ancient Andean ceramic vessel for ANT272: Andean Archaeology.

The Pulse

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