Curriculum Overview 

The Department of Classics provides instruction in Greek, Latin, ancient history and classical art and archaeology. Classics is an interdisciplinary area studies program, applying the approaches of humanists and social scientists to the history, art, language, literature, philosophy, religion, social structures, economy, everyday life and government of the ancient Mediterranean. Classics students learn how to weigh and assimilate information from a variety of media and disciplines in order to become productive and thoughtful citizens of a rapidly changing world.

Students majoring in “Classics” select one of two tracks, either “Classical Society” or “Classical Languages and Literatures,” depending on whether their interests in Greece and Rome incline more towards social scientific approaches or linguistic and literary studies. Students in both tracks share a common core of coursework that ensures familiarity with major disciplinary approaches contained in Classics. All students complete the major with a senior capstone seminar that draws on the range of interests and learning among our student majors toward the investigation of a topic that spans Greek and Roman cultures and the variety of disciplinary approaches applied to their study.

Coursework Required for a Major in Classics

Classical Languages and Literatures: 12 courses distributed as follows:

9 courses in Greek and Latin (at least 3 courses must be taken in each language, i.e. to 201 or above depending on point of placement, and 2 courses must be at the 300 level)

2 courses from two of the three subject areas of History (CLS 113, 114), Archaeology (CLS 115, 117), Literature in English translation (CLS 230 and other CLS literature courses);

1 senior capstone seminar (CLS 4XX)

Classical Society: 12 courses distributed as follows:

1 introductory history course (CLS 113 or 114)

1 introductory archaeology course (CLS 115 or 117)

3 courses in Greek or Latin, i.e. either language to the 201 level or from point of placement

1 200-level CLS literature course

3 electives in any 200-level (or above) GRK, LAT, CLS courses or other approved courses (e.g. in philosophy, political science, art history, religious studies)

2 300-level CLS courses

1 400-level senior capstone seminar (CLS 4XX)

A minor in Classics is earned by taking 6 courses, 4 of which must be in one of the three subject areas of Classics coursework, i.e. Greek (GRK), Latin (LAT), Archaeology and History (CLS). Only three 100-level courses may be counted toward the minor, and one course must be at the 300-level.

Majors in the Department of Classics have studied abroad in the following programs in recent years: American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Summer Program); College Year in Athens; Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome; Advanced Studies in England, Bath; Arcadia University in Greece; departmental summer programs in Italy and Greece. See the International Programs section of the Catalog for further information.

Courses in English

COURSES IN ENGLISH

Designated as “Classics,” the following courses require no knowledge of Greek or Latin, unless otherwise indicated.

113. The History of Ancient Greece. (S)

Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great in the Mediterranean and Near Eastern context. Students are also introduced to the problems and methods of historical inquiry. Same as HIS 113.     

Castor

114. The History of Ancient Rome. (S)

The transformation from Republic to Principate and the collapse of the empire are explored. Students are also introduced to the problems and methods of historical inquiry. Same as HIS 114.    

Castor

115. Greek Art and Archaeology. (A)

This course provides an overview of the archaeological monuments of ancient Greece. Coursework will focus on methodological approaches to analyzing building techniques, trends, styles and the social, political and religious functions of art and monumental architecture in ancient Greek society. Topics covered in lecture and classroom discussion will include archaeological and art historical interpretations of sacred and public architecture, urbanism, three-dimensional sculpture, relief sculpture, painting and decorative arts. There is a required field trip. Same as ART 115.    

Meyers, Steiner

117. Roman Art and Archaeology. (A)

This course provides an overview of the archaeological monuments of ancient Rome. Coursework will focus on methodological approaches to analyzing building techniques, trends, styles and the social, political and religious functions of art and monumental architecture in ancient Roman society. Topics covered in lecture and classroom discussion will include archaeological and art historical interpretations of sacred and public architecture, urbanism, three-dimensional sculpture, relief sculpture, painting and decorative arts. There is a required field trip. Same as ART 117.    

Meyers

210. History of Ancient Philosophy. (H)

How should one live? What is happiness for a human being? These questions are the focus of the philosophy of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. In the work of these thinkers, such questions lead to wide ranging philosophical inquiry in ethics, moral psychology, epistemology, metaphysics, political theory, aesthetics, and beyond. This course surveys their main arguments and theories, which became the cornerstone of the western European philosophical tradition. Same as PHI 210.    

Stoll

230. Classical Myth. (H)

Introduction to the myths of ancient Greece and Rome and their relationship to the art, history, philosophy and religions of their respective cultures. Students will explore the Classical conception of the interactions between mortals, heroes and divinities through a wide range of media and textual genres. Connections between Greek and Roman myths as well as the adaptation of mythical traditions from Near East cultures will be discussed.    

Steiner, Fowler

242. Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity. (H)

The aim of this course is to explore the cultural constructions of gender and sexuality in the ancient societies of Greece and Rome. We will approach questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire and the body. We will examine archaeological, visual and literary evidence through assigned reading and class discussion. This interdisciplinary approach will allow us to gain an understanding of gender and sexuality in antiquity and will offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes. Same as WGS 242.    

Meyers

321. Selected Studies in Greek History. (S)

A close examination of a particular period, place or individual in ancient Greek history. Seminar topics include “Alexander the Great” and “5th-century Athens.” Prerequisite: CLS/HIS 113. Same as HIS 321.     

Castor

322. Selected Studies in Roman History. (S)

A close examination of a particular period, place or individual in ancient Roman history. Seminar topics include “Imperial Women: Power Behind the Throne.” Prerequisite: CLS/HIS 114. Same as HIS 322.            

Castor

37x. Topics in Greek Art and Archaeology. (A)

A close examination of a particular aspect of ancient Greek sculpture, architecture, or vase painting, or a close study of the archaeological remains from a particular chronological period of ancient Greece. Seminar topics include “Greeks in South Italy.” Prerequisite: ART/CLS 115 or permission. Same as ART 37x.     

Steiner

37x. Topics in Roman Art and Archaeology. (A)

A close examination of a particular aspect of ancient Roman sculpture, architecture or painting, or a close study of the archaeological remains from a particular chronological period of ancient Rome. Seminar topics include “Art of the Augustan Age.” Prerequisite: ART/CLS 117 or permission. Same as ART 37x.     

Meyers

381. Plato. (H)

An intensive treatment of some of the major philosophical themes in selected dialogues of Plato. Prerequisite: CLS/PHI 210. Same as PHI 381.

47x. Senior Capstone Research Seminar in Classics

This course prepares students for advanced level research in Classics. The seminar focuses on the multidisciplinary aspects of Classics research including literature and philological studies, historical and archaeological analysis. Each student will prepare a significant research project based on the seminar’s thematic topic, which will vary with each offering.     

O’Bryhim

 

Courses in Greek

101. Elementary Ancient Greek I.

Introduction to the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Offered every Fall.    

Biles

102. Elementary Ancient Greek II.

Continues the study of the basic grammar and syntax of Classical Greek. Prerequisite: GRK 101 or placement. Offered Every Spring.    

Biles

201. Introduction to Greek Prose. (LS)

Review of principles of grammar and syntax through composition exercises and introductory readings of authentic Greek prose. Prerequisite: GRK 102 or placement. Offered every Fall.    

Castor, Fowler

202. Introduction to Greek Poetry. (H)

Introduction to Greek poetry with emphasis on diction, meter and literary interpretation. Prerequisite: GRK 201 or permission of the instructor. Offered every Spring.    

Biles, Steiner

311. Greek Historians.* (H)

An examination of the historical writings of Herodotus and Thucydides with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Biles

312. Greek Oratory.* (H)

An examination of the Athenian orators Lysias and Demosthenes with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.  

 Staff

314. Greek Lyric Poetry.* (H)

An examination of selected Archaic lyric poets (e.g. Archilochus, Sappho, Alcaeus, Alcman), with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Staff

315. Greek Comedy.* (H)

An examination of a comedy of Aristophanes with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Biles, O’Bryhim

316. Greek Tragedy.* (H)

An examination of a tragedy with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Biles

320. Greek Philosophy.* (H)

An examination of a Platonic dialogue with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Staff

321. Greek Epic.* (H)

An examination of Homer’s Iliad with emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Biles, Steiner

*Repeatable by permission of department.

 

Courses in Latin

101. Elementary Latin I.

Introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of Classical Latin. Normally open only to students who have had no prior experience in the formal study of Latin. Offered every Fall.     

Fowler, O’Bryhim

102. Elementary Latin II.

Continues and completes the study of the basic grammar and syntax of Classical Latin. Prerequisite: LAT 101 or placement. Offered every Spring.    

Fowler, O’Bryhim

103. Accelerated Latin.

Intensive study of Latin grammar. This course compresses the material from LAT 101 and 102 into one semester, thus enabling the student to enter LAT 201 after one semester of instruction. Intended for motivated students and for those who have placed into this course after taking Latin in high school.    

Staff

201. Introduction to Latin Prose. (LS)

Introduction to Latin prose incorporating a review of forms and structures. Successful completion of the course signifies that the student has mastered the elements of Latin and is prepared to begin the study of Roman texts. Prerequisite: LAT 102 or placement. Offered every Fall.            

Meyers, O’Bryhim

202. Introduction to Latin Poetry. (H)

Introduction to Latin poetry with the goal of developing speed and facility in meter and interpretation. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or placement. Offered every Spring.    

O’Bryhim

311. Latin Historians.* (H)

An examination of the histories of Tacitus with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Biles, Meyers

312. Latin Oratory.* (H)

An examination of the speeches of Cicero with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Staff

313. Latin Epic.* (H)

An examination of selected Latin epics with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Staff

315. Latin Comedy.* (H)

An examination of the comedies of Plautus with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.  

Staff

316. Latin Tragedy.* (H)

An examination of the tragedies of Seneca with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Staff

318. Latin Satire.* (H)

An examination of the satires of Horace, Persius and Juvenal with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Biles, O’Bryhim

319. Latin Letters.* (H)

An examination of the letters of Cicero, Pliny and Fronto with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Staff

320. Latin Philosophy.* (H)

An examination of the philosophical works of Cicero with an emphasis on translation, interpretation, evaluating scholarship and research.    

Fowler

*Repeatable by permission of department.

 

 

Topics Courses Expected to be Offered in 2018-2019

  • Ancient Laughter    Biles
  • Race and Ethnicity in the Ancient World    Castor
  • Latin Novel: Petronius       O’Bryhim
  • Topics in Roman Archaeology: Augustan Art & Architecture        Meyers